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Trump with the team of officials who helped broker the Israel-UAE agreement. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

The signing ceremony of the U.S.-brokered normalization agreement between Israel and the United Arab Emirates will take place at the White House on Sept. 15, according to White House officials.

Why it matters: This will be the first signing of a peace agreement between Israel and an Arab state in more than 25 years.

Details: White House officials said President Trump will attend the ceremony alongside a senior Israeli delegation headed by Prime Minister Netanyahu and a senior Emirati delegation headed by Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed — a senior member of the royal family.

  • It will be the first-ever public meeting between an Israeli prime minister and an Emirati minister.
  • Many meetings have taken place in the past, but they were kept secret.

Between the lines: The agreement between Israel and the United Arab Emirates will be a "treaty of peace" with the same legal and diplomatic status as peace agreements Israel has previously signed with Egypt and Jordan, Israeli and U.S. officials tell me.

  • Israel wants the agreement to carry the most serious status, demanding the greatest commitment from both parties, Israeli officials explain.
  • Officials also hope the agreement will send a message of long-term stability, rather than a temporary deal.

This story is breaking news. Please check back for updates.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
Updated Nov 24, 2020 - World

Tracking Biden's first calls to world leaders

Combination images of New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and President-elect Joe Biden. Photo: NZ Prime Minister's Office/Instagram/Joe Raedle/Getty Images

One ritual of becoming president-elect is the carousel of congratulatory phone calls with other world leaders.

What to watch: The order in which the calls are returned is watched closely around the world.

Scoop: Trump tells confidants he plans to pardon Michael Flynn

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump has told confidants he plans to pardon his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts, two sources with direct knowledge of the discussions tell Axios.

Behind the scenes: Sources with direct knowledge of the discussions said Flynn will be part of a series of pardons that Trump issues between now and when he leaves office.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.