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A person voting in Davenport, Iowa, on Oct. 5. Photo: Daniel Acker for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Iowa Supreme Court upheld a law that prevents county election auditors from using the state's voter registration database to fill in any missing information or correct errors on ballot applications as they have in prior elections.

Why it matters: The ruling comes just days before the state's Oct. 24 deadline for absentee ballot applications. Deficient requests may go unfulfilled if voters are unable to correct errors or add information to their applications.

Go deeper

Voter suppression then and now

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Barry Lewis/Getty Images 

From its start, the United States gave citizens the right to vote — as long as they were white men who owned property. From counting a slave as 3/5 of a white man to the creation of the Electoral College, there's a through-line of barriers that extends to today based on racial politics.

Why it matters: 150 years after the 15th Amendment — and 55 years after the passage of the Voting Rights Act — people of color still face systemic obstacles to voting.

Oct 17, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The wait to vote

Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Above: People in Atlanta wait to cast ballots on the first day of early voting for the general election, Oct. 12, 2020.

Below: Voters in cars line up at a drive-through mail ballot drop-off site on October 7, 2020 in Houston after Texas Gov. Gregg Abbott issued an executive order limiting each county to one mail ballot drop-off site.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Key government agency says Biden transition can formally begin

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy. Photo: Alex Edelman/CNP/Getty Images

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that she has determined the transition from the Trump administration can formally begin.

Why it matters: Murphy, a Trump appointee, had come under fire for delaying the so-called "ascertainment" and withholding the funds and information needed for the transition to begin while Trump's legal challenges played out.