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Internet data is becoming easier to search, organize

KPCB

It's no surprise that the amount of internet data being created is skyrocketing, but what's important to focus on is how much of that data is"structured," meaning it's highly organized and can be easily classified or picked up by a search algorithm. According to Mary Meeker's annual tech trends report, roughly 10% of data is now structured. That's expected to reach 16% by 2020, even as the amount of data nearly quadruples.

What's the difference? Email is widely considered unstructured data, while anything that is tagged or can be easily scanned through machine-learning, like a spreadsheet, is typically considered structured data.

Why it matters: Structured data helps new internet-based companies grow -- including ones that provide goods and services in niche areas, like healthcare, connected homes, driverless cars, etc. It also helps older companies better leverage existing data. As data structuring becomes more sophisticated through advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence, it creates more opportunities for data-driven companies to make a bigger economic impact.

Axios 7 hours ago
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Axios 5 hours ago
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North Korea says it is stopping nuclear and missile testing

Kim Jong-un sits at a desk.
Kim Jong-un. Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has announced the country will stop conducting nuclear tests and launches of intercontinental ballistic missiles starting April 21, and shut down a nuclear test site in the north side of the country, through a broadcast on the state news agency KCNA reports, and President Trump announced in a tweet, later adding quotes from the message.