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Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

President Biden declared victory in announcing the bipartisan infrastructure package. Now comes the hard part: negotiating with his own party on the separate reconciliation bill.

Why it matters: By trying to simultaneously pass two massive spending bills, Biden and congressional leaders are attempting a legislative feat that will likely require Congress to work through its August recess — and potentially well into the fall, according to lawmakers and senior staffers.

  • Even then, the prospects for success are long.

What they're saying: “We have to be prepared to be here for as long as it takes," Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) told Axios' Sarah Mucha.

  • “We’re not doing one step unless we’ve done the other. We need to be willing to put in the time to get that done.”

Driving the news: Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) all indicated Thursday that the bipartisan agreement won’t become law unless a separate reconciliation bill is assured.

  • “If this is the only thing that comes to me, I’m not signing it,” Biden said. “It’s in tandem.”
  • “There ain’t no infrastructure bill without the reconciliation bill,” Pelosi told reporters.
  • “Everyone in our caucus knows you can’t do one without the other. We don’t have the votes for one, unless you have the votes for the other one,” Schumer said.

The big picture: White House officials have been working the phones to ensure the bipartisan agreement — which would spend an additional $579 billion in a package priced at $1.2 trillion over eight years — will survive challenges from progressives in the House and Senate.

  • While key House transportation leaders haven’t agreed to the bipartisan deal, administration officials are confident they have the votes, according to people familiar with the process.
  • But all sides are bracing for a brutal battle about what will be included in the reconciliation package, its total price tag and how much money it will raise with new revenue from corporations and individuals.
  • Congress also will have to increase the debt ceiling, which is set to reach its limit on July 31.

Go deeper: While progressives are talking about a potential $6 trillion budget resolution, Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) will likely set the cap below $2 trillion.

  • That will put pressure on progressives to winnow and agree on their priorities.
  • That's not the only challenge.
  • Moderate House Democrats are threatening to vote against any tax bill that doesn’t eliminate the $10,000 limit for an exemption on state and local tax payments, which costs $70 billion to $80 billion per year.

By the numbers: The White House is privately pleased it convinced Republican senators to accept a more expansive definition of infrastructure, with $266 billion for projects that aren’t traditional roads, bridges and airports.

  • Broadband is set to receive $65 billion.
  • Waterways are allotted $55 billion.
  • The power grid is slated for $73 billion.
  • And for environmental remediation, there’s $21 billion.

Between the lines: The White House also is claiming victory because Biden reached a deal without violating his two redlines.

  • No tax increases on families making less than $400,000.
  • Inaction was not an option, Biden frequently said.

Be smart: The pending legislative battle will serve as a full-employment act for Democratic lobbyists on K Street.

  • They'll be in play for debates about everything from the corporate tax rate to Medicare expansion to billion-dollar issues that won't make headlines.

Go deeper

Biden expected to announce new eviction ban

Photo: Bloomberg / Contributor

President Biden is expected to reveal a new, more "targeted" ban on evictions, three sources familiar with the matter confirmed to Axios.

Why it matters: The Biden administration allowed the previous eviction moratorium to expire on Saturday night — putting millions of people at risk of homelessness.

22 hours ago - Health

Biden to GOP governors who resist COVID rules: "Get out of the way"

President Biden speaks at the White House on Tuesday. Photo: Shawn Thew/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Biden spoke out Tuesday against Republican governors who've sought to block vaccine and mask mandates, as COVID-19 cases spike across the U.S.

Why it matters: Biden has tried to avoid making the pandemic a partisan issue, but the Washington Post notes the White House "has grown increasingly frustrated" with Republican leaders looking to obstruct health measures.

Landlords mount legal challenge to Biden admin's new eviction moratorium

President Biden at the White House on Tuesday. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

A group of landlords and real-estate companies issued a legal challenge on Wednesday night in a D.C. district court to the Biden administration's new national eviction moratorium.

Driving the news: The Alabama and Georgia Associations of Realtors' emergency motion argues that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's order Tuesday barring evictions for most of the U.S. through Oct. 3 exceeds the CDC's powers, according to a statement from the National Association of Realtors.