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Photo: Phil Roeder/Getty Images

The House Rules Committee advanced on Wednesday a resolution 9-4 on plans to formalize the impeachment inquiry procedure against President Trump.

Details: House Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern Rep. Jim McGovern on Tuesday filed the resolution directing relevant committees to continue their inquiry "into whether sufficient grounds exist for the House of Representatives to exercise its Constitutional power to impeach Donald John Trump." It calls for open hearings and demands the House Intelligence Committee draft a report outlining findings and recommendations.

The big picture: The resolution comes as the administration and congressional Republicans have tried to dismiss the impeachment inquiry, saying the lack of a formal vote on the measure goes against long-standing precedent.

  • The House will vote on the measure Thursday.

Of note: The resolution gives committees' ranking Republicans the ability to subpoena witnesses, should the committee chair agree.

What they're saying: Reps. Adam Schiff, Jerry Nadler, Eliot Engel and Carolyn Maloney issued a statement on Tuesday explaining: "The resolution provides rules for the format of open hearings in the House Intelligence Committee, including staff-led questioning of witnesses, and it authorizes the public release of deposition transcripts."

  • "The resolution also establishes procedures for the transfer of evidence to the Judiciary Committee as it considers potential articles of impeachment, and it sets forth due process rights for the President and his Counsel in the Judiciary Committee proceedings.
  • "The evidence we have already collected paints the picture of a President who abused his power by using multiple levers of government to press a foreign country to interfere in the 2020 election.
  • "Following in the footsteps of previous impeachment inquiries, the next phase will move from closed depositions to open hearings where the American people will learn firsthand about the President’s misconduct."
  • Per AP, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell indicated Republican lawmakers planned to review the resolution to determine if it passes a "smell test."

The other side: White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said, "The resolution put forward by Speaker Pelosi confirms that House Democrats’ impeachment has been an illegitimate sham from the start as it lacked any proper authorization by a House vote ... [and] does nothing to change the fundamental fact that House Democrats refuse to provide basic due process rights to the Administration."

Read the resolution here:

Go deeper: How an impeachment inquiry works

Editor's note: This article has been updated to note the advancement of the bill.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.

Fringe right plots new attacks out of sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Domestic extremists are using obscure and private corners of the internet to plot new attacks ahead of Inauguration Day. Their plans are also hidden in plain sight, buried in podcasts and online video platforms.

Why it matters: Because law enforcement was caught flat-footed during last week's Capitol siege, researchers and intelligence agencies are paying more attention to online threats that could turn into real-world violence.

Kids’ screen time up 50% during pandemic

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

When the coronavirus lockdowns started in March, kidstech firm SuperAwesome found that screen time was up 50%. Nearly a year later, that percentage hasn't budged, according to new figures from the firm.

Why it matters: For most parents, pre-pandemic expectations around screen time are no longer realistic. The concern now has shifted from the number of hours in front of screens to the quality of screen time.