Photo: Alex Wong / Getty

The Information Technology Industry council, a major tech lobby, sent a letter last night to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services calling for the H-4 visa rule to be upheld.

Why it matters: USCIS is expected to end the H-4 work eligibility program, which allows the spouses of H-1B holders with pending green cards to legally work in the U.S.

Who they lobby for: Google, Facebook, Apple, Amazon and others. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, FWD.us and TechNet also joined in sending the letter.

Why it matters: ITI President and CEO Dean Garfield told Axios that they hope the letter would push the administration to "do the right thing, and don’t resign the program." He predicts H-1B holders will consider leaving the U.S. if the H-4 visa work program ends, which would be a detriment to many tech companies. "If I were told or my wife was told that one of us couldn’t contribute to sustaining our family… we would pursue those other options."

From the letter:

"The H-4 rule is instrumental in allowing U.S. employers to fill these critical positions with qualified professionals. Our companies employ individuals whose work authorizations stem not only from H-1B visas, but H-4 visas as well. The H-4 rule represents a valuable but targeted opportunity for us to not just attract and retain talent, but to promote immigration to the United States on the basis of one’s skills and merit."

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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) has tested positive for COVID-19 and plans to quarantine at his home for the next 14 days, his office announced Thursday. He currently has no symptoms.

Why it matters: The 73-year-old DeWine was set to meet President Trump Thursday on the tarmac at an airport in Cleveland and was tested as part of standard protocol. He is the second governor known to have contracted the coronavirus, after Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R).

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NOAA warns of potential for "extremely active" Atlantic hurricane season

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasters warned Thursday of the potential for an "extremely active" hurricane season in the Atlantic.

The big picture: The agency expects 19 to 25 named storms — with three to six major hurricanes — during the six-month hurricane season, which ends Nov. 30. The average season produces only 12 named storms.