Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that President Trump's comments about the federal government's stockpile of medical equipment suggest he "does not understand the word 'federal.'"

Why it matters: White House adviser Jared Kushner argued at a press briefing last week that the "notion of the federal stockpile was it’s supposed to be our stockpile; it’s not supposed to be state stockpiles that they then use."

  • Trump defended Kushner's comments and said that state governments should have been building their own stockpiles and that the federal government is not "an ordering clerk for the states."
  • The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' website was later edited to match Kushner's comments. Language that suggested that state governments can access the stockpile to support their response efforts was erased.

What he's saying: "If he were right, why would we ever need a Federal Emergency Management Agency?" Pritzker said. "It's because individual states can't possibly do what the federal government can do. We don't have a Defense Production Act."

  • "There's no way that we could stockpile in anticipation of a pandemic that no one anticipated, and yet the federal government is responsible for doing precisely that," he added.

The big picture: The federal stockpile of personal protective equipment is nearly depleted as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, leaving the Trump administration and states to compete for supplies in a "freewheeling global marketplace rife with profiteering and price-gouging," the Washington Post reported last week.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has had to release strategies for stretching mask supplies further because the nation can't manufacture enough medical masks or ventilators to meet demand, Axios' Caitlin Owens reports.
  • The guidelines included reusing masks or, in truly desperate times, using bandanas and scarves.
  • The stockpile is also low on ventilators, a breathing device that dozens of governors have been requesting from the federal government in order to treat critical coronavirus patients.

Go deeper ... Surgeon general: This week will be "Pearl Harbor" or "9/11 moment" in U.S.

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Biden: The next president should decide on Ginsburg’s replacement

Joe Biden. Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Joe Biden is calling for the winner of November's presidential election to select Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court.

What he's saying: "[L]et me be clear: The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," Biden said. "This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That's the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election's only 46 days off.

Trump, McConnell to move fast to replace Ginsburg

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump will move within days to nominate his third Supreme Court justice in just three-plus short years — and shape the court for literally decades to come, top Republican sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans are ready to move to confirm Trump's nominee before Election Day, just 46 days away, setting up one of the most consequential periods of our lifetimes, the sources say.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 30,393,591 — Total deaths: 950,344— Total recoveries: 20,679,272Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 6,722,699 — Total deaths: 198,484 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.