Photo: Smith Collection, Gado/via Getty Images

Between July and September of this year, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested 41 people who had come forward as potential sponsors of undocumented migrant children. 70% of those arrests were due to the sponsors — who are often the child's family members — being in the U.S. illegally, CNN's Tal Kopan reports.

Why it matters: Health and Human Services recently instituted stricter vetting procedures including background checks and finger printing for all potential immigrant child sponsors. Immigration advocates have feared that this information would be used by the Trump administration to round up more undocumented immigrants in the U.S.

The big picture: While the administration says they increased vetting standards for the children's protection, there has been concern that it would deter sponsors from coming forward — especially if they are undocumented.

The bottom line: HHS is having to deal with record number of immigrant children, and time spent in HHS shelters has doubled since 2016. Meanwhile, the temporary tent facilities being used to house migrant children in HHS care have tripled in size, per CNN.

Go deeper

Hurricane Zeta makes landfall on Louisiana coast as Category 2 storm

A satellite image of Hurricane Zeta. Photo: National Hurricane Center/NOAA

Hurricane Zeta made landfall along the southeastern coast of Louisiana as a Category 2 storm on Wednesday, bringing with it "life-threatening storm surge and strong winds," per the National Hurricane Center.

What's happening: The hurricane was producing maximum sustained winds of nearly 110 mph and stronger gusts.

Updated 54 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Biden ahead in Wisconsin, Michigan as cases surge in the Midwest.
  2. Health: Surge "is real" and not just caused by more tests, Trump's testing czar saysMask mandates help control rise in hospitalizations Some coronavirus survivors have "autoantibodies."
  3. Business: Surge is sinking consumer confidence Testing is a windfall.
  4. World: Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" coronavirus wave France imposes lockdown as Macron warns of overwhelming second COVID wave Germany to close bars and restaurants for a month.
  5. Sports: Boston Marathon delayed as COVID-19 surges MLB to investigate Dodgers player who joined celebration after positive COVID test.

What the 2020 election means for science

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The 2020 presidential election presents two stark paths for the direction of future-focused scientific research.

Why it matters: Science is a long game, with today's breakthroughs often stemming from research carried out decades ago, often with government help. That means the person who occupies the White House over the next four years will help shape the state of technology for decades into the future.