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Lindsay-Rae McIntyre will start July 1 after settling a suit brought by IBM. (Photo: Microsoft)

Microsoft says its new diversity chief will start in July after she settled a lawsuit with IBM, her former employer. IBM had sued Lindsay-Rae McIntyre alleging she was in violation of a non-compete agreement.

The bottom line: The suit was an odd one to begin with as diversity tends to be an area where, at least on the surface, tech companies tend to be working together. By settling, both sides avoid would could have been bad publicity had the case gone further.

Both sides happy: Microsoft and IBM both said they were happy to see a resolution.

Microsoft's statement: "We’re pleased this matter is resolved and we’re thrilled that Lindsay-Rae McIntyre will be joining Microsoft as our Chief Diversity Officer. She'll take up her new role in July 2018.”

IBM's statement: "We're pleased the court granted IBM's motion for a temporary restraining order, protecting IBM's confidential information and diversity strategies. We’re glad the action has been resolved to the satisfaction of all parties and that Ms. McIntyre will not begin her new responsibilities until July."

Go deeper

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.

Senate confirms Antony Blinken as secretary of state

Antony Blinken. Photo: Alex Edelman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate voted 78-22 on Tuesday to confirm Antony Blinken as secretary of state.

Why it matters: Blinken, a longtime adviser to President Biden, will lead the administration's diplomatic efforts to re-engage with the world after four years of former President Trump's "America first" policy.

1 hour ago - World

Former Google CEO and others call for U.S.-China tech "bifurcation"

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A new set of proposals by a group of influential D.C. insiders and tech industry practitioners calling for a degree of "bifurcation" in the U.S. and Chinese tech sectors is circulating in the Biden administration. Axios has obtained a copy.

Why it matters: The idea of "decoupling" certain sectors of the U.S. and Chinese economies felt radical three years ago, when Trump's trade war brought the term into common parlance. But now the strategy has growing bipartisan and even industry support.