Bob Herman Feb 14, 2017
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Humana to exit Obamacare exchanges in 2018

Ed Reinke / AP

Humana is ready to jump ship completely on Obamacare. Executives said Tuesday that Humana "cannot continue to offer" Obamacare coverage for 2018, saying that the recent enrollment period showed the exchanges still have too many sick people and not enough healthy enrollees.

Humana spokesman Tom Noland confirmed that Humana, which had already scaled back its Obamacare participation, would stop selling coverage both on and off the individual exchanges in 2018. It has 152,000 customers in those plans. Federal law bars insurers from re-entering the marketplaces for five years, assuming they discontinue all types of individual policies.

Why this matters: Humana is now the first health insurance company to publicly come out and say it will completely end all Obamacare plans after this year. Other insurers are debating their participation internally and are waiting for President Trump and Republicans in Congress to put out an Obamacare replacement plan before they commit to the individual market. But the inability of Republicans to coalesce around a new plan is starting to have a real effect.

What to watch for: This could be the beginning of a domino effect in the individual market. If the Trump administration doesn't adequately stabilize the exchanges, more insurers could follow Humana, leaving many consumers out of health insurance options for 2018.

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Trump: Transgender people "disqualified" from the military

SecDef Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford.
Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford. Photo: Andrew Harrer-Pool / Getty Images

President Trump late Friday issued an order disqualifying most transgender people from serving in the military.

"[T]ransgender persons with a history or diagnosis of gender dysphoria -- individuals who the policies state may require substantial medical treatment, including medications and surgery -- are disqualified from military service except under certain limited circumstances."

Why it matters: Anything short of an inclusive policy for transgender troops will be viewed as a continuation of the ban Trump announced on Twitter in August.

Haley Britzky 3 hours ago
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Both Bush and Obama also requested line item veto power

Donald Trump.
Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Friday evening that to avoid having "this omnibus situation from ever happening again," he wants Congress to re-instate "a line-item veto."

Why it matters: This would allow him to veto specific parts of a bill without getting rid of the entire thing. Trump was deeply unhappy with the $1.3 trillion spending bill approved by Congress early Friday morning, but signed it anyway on Friday afternoon.