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The Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Federal Housing Finance Agency announced foreclosures and evictions will be postponed as the coronavirus continues to negatively impact the U.S. economy

Yes, but: While the move will help more than 30 million American homeowners, it leaves behind the country's nearly 40 million renters who could likely struggle to pay their rent next month as hard financial times hit the country, The Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: David Dworkin, president of the National Housing Conference, told the Post giving renters the option to skip a few payments won't be enough since they will be under pressure to pay their past due amounts all at once. The debt could be unaffordable for many people, particularly those in low-wage jobs.

The big picture: "As renters and homeowners grapple with mass layoffs and business closures, housing advocates, the mortgage industry and banks are growing increasingly concerned that the country will soon face a housing crisis that will rival the one that helped nearly take down the economy a decade ago," the Post writes.

The state of play: There's already been an increase in the number of borrowers seeking help. The pause on evictions and foreclosures will last until mid-May but regulators said it could be extended.

The HUD order applies to single-family homeowners struggling to pay their Federal Housing Administration-supported mortgages, per the Post.

  • It also applies to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac loans, which cover about 28 million Americans' mortgages.

Go deeper: Pentagon preparing coronavirus quarantine housing for up to 1,000 people

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Updated 8 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Harvard and MIT sue Trump administration over rule barring foreign students from online classes

A Harvard Law School graduate on campus before attending an online graduation ceremony on May 28. Photo: Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Harvard and MIT on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security to block federal guidance that would largely bar foreign college students from taking classes if their universities move classes entirely online in the fall.

The big picture: Colleges, which often rely heavily on tuition from international students, face a unique challenge to safely get students back to class during the coronavirus pandemic. Some elite institutions, like Harvard, have already made the decision to go virtual.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 11,856,991 — Total deaths: 544,871 — Total recoveries — 6,473,170Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 2,996,333 — Total deaths: 131,481 — Total recoveries: 936,476 — Total tested: 36,878,106Map.
  3. Public health: Deaths are rising in hotspots — Déjà vu sets in as testing issues rise and PPE dwindles.
  4. Travel: How the pandemic changed mobility habits, by state.
  5. 🎧Podcast: A misinformation "infodemic" is here.

Facebook auditors say it's failing on civil rights

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The findings from a new civil rights audit commissioned and released by Facebook show that the tech giant repeatedly failed to address issues of hatred, bigotry and manipulation on its platform.

Why it matters: The report comes as Facebook confronts a growing advertiser boycott and criticism for prioritizing freedom of speech over limiting misinformation and protecting users targeted by hate speech.