Photo: Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

China's Huawei is set to sell a majority slice of its undersea cable division to Hengtong Optic-Electric Co., a Chinese manufacturer of optical cables, per a Shanghai regulatory filing.

Why it matters, via Axios' Dan Primack: This is the first concrete indication that Huawei is scaling back some of its global infrastructure ambitions.

The intrigue: The move comes as the Trump administration continues its push against the Chinese telecom giant, arguing that it might use its expansion across sectors like 5G to spy on Americans. Bloomberg notes that Huawei's undersea cable project "has drawn scrutiny because of its role in building fundamental internet-connection infrastructure."

Worth noting: Huawei did not disclose terms or timing for the deal, which is not formalized and still may change.

Go deeper: Huawei founder says company does not spy for China

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
4 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Zooming in on China's new energy plan

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Major climate news arrived on Tuesday when Chinese President Xi Jinping said China would aim for "carbon neutrality" by 2060 and a CO2 emissions peak before 2030.

Why it matters: China is by far the world's largest greenhouse gas emitter. So its success or failure at reining in planet-warming gases affects everyone's future.

Updated 25 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 31,647,930 — Total deaths: 971,711 Total recoveries: 21,776,599Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 6,897,661 — Total deaths: 200,818 — Total recoveries: 2,646,959 — Total tests: 96,612,436Map.
  3. Health: Hospitals want more time to repay pandemic loans — Supply shortages continue to plague testing.
  4. Business: The high-wage jobs aren't coming back
  5. Vaccines: Johnson & Johnson begins large phase 3 trial — The FDA plans to toughen standards.
  6. Sports: Less travel is causing the NBA to see better basketball.
Kendall Baker, author of Sports
1 hour ago - Sports

Less travel is causing the NBA to see better basketball

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

In addition to keeping out the coronavirus, the NBA bubble has also delivered a stellar on-court product, with crisp, entertaining play night in and night out.

Why it matters: General managers, athletic trainers and league officials believe the lack of travel is a driving force behind the high quality of play — an observation that could lead to scheduling changes for next season and beyond.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!