Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Uber released more details about how it will compensate drivers affected by COVID-19, which will be based on their average daily earnings over the last six months.

Why it matters: Ride-hailing and delivery drivers are among the most vulnerable as the virus spreads, both because of the very social nature of their jobs and because they don't qualify for sick leave as independent contractors.

Details:

  • The driver must have completed one trip in the 30 days before March 6 and be diagnosed with COVID-19, be placed in quarantine, asked to self-isolate by a health authority, or have their account restricted because Uber was notified of a diagnosis or exposure.
  • Uber will use the average daily rate a driver has earned in the last six months, or since their first trip if they signed up more recently. Rates will vary per country.
  • For example, a San Francisco driver who earned on average $28.57 per day will get up to $400, while one who earned $121.42 per day will get up to $1,700.
  • Drivers will have 30 days since diagnosis or quarantine date to file a claim online and will be eligible for up to 14 days of compensation.
  • This will not apply in the case of a citywide shutdown of the service.

Lyft, which also announced it will compensate drivers diagnosed or quarantined, will base the amount on their earnings over the previous four weeks, though it hasn't released more details.

The bottom line: Neither company's approach is perfect, and a lot of edge cases could lead to disappointing payouts for drivers, but the current extenuating circumstances were unlikely to be anticipated by any gig economy company.

Go deeper: Virus spread emphasizes precariousness of gig economy work

Go deeper

Democrats' mail voting pivot

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Democrats spent the early months of the coronavirus pandemic urging their base to vote absentee. But as threats of U.S. Postal Service delays, Team Trump litigation and higher ballot rejection rates become clearer, many are pivoting to promote more in-person voting as well.

Why it matters: Democrats are exponentially more likely to vote by mail than Republicans this year — and if enough mail-in ballots are lost, rejected on a technicality or undercounted, it could change the outcome of the presidential election or other key races.

New interactive tool shows Biden's mail voting danger

Data: SurveyMonkey; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Voters who disapprove of President Trump most strongly are by far the most likely to vote by mail in the presidential election, according to an Axios analysis of exclusive data from SurveyMonkey and Tableau.

Why it matters: The new data shows just how strongly the mail-in vote is likely to favor Joe Biden — with potentially enormous implications in the swing states due to the greater risk of rejection with mail ballots.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
54 mins ago - Health

Reopening the ACA debate is politically risky for GOP

Data: Kaiser Family Foundation, The Cook Political Report; Notes: Those losing insurance includes 2020 ACA marketplace enrollment and 2019 Medicaid expansion enrollment among newly-eligible enrollees. Close races are those defined as "Toss up" or "Lean R/D"; Table: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The sudden uncertainty surrounding the future of the Affordable Care Act could be an enormous political liability for Republicans in key states come November.

Between the lines: Millions of people in crucial presidential and Senate battlegrounds would lose their health care coverage if the Supreme Court strikes down the law, as the Trump administration is urging it to.

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