May 7, 2017

Trump 101: His advisers talk about him like he’s a child

Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Thanks to a leaky administration, everyone gets an inside look at how the Trump White House operates. Aides often leak stories about the difficulty of managing Trump — as if they were his babysitters. Here are some of the clearest examples, sourced from Axios, the New York Times, the Washington Post and Politico.

  • No more TV: Aides said they try to give Trump "better choices" or jam his schedule with meetings to keep him away from reading about or watching himself on TV (and then tweeting about it). An advisor told Washington Post, "Once he goes upstairs, there's no managing him."
  • Show and tell: Aides know Trump responds best to visuals. Typically, when someone wants to sell him on something they use props, according to Jonathan Swan. An official once told NYT, "The president likes maps."
  • Maps: In fact, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue used a map showing the "Trump country" areas of the U.S. that would be hardest hit by NAFTA's termination to convince Trump to keep the trade agreement, according to Washington Post.
  • No friends until work is done: Reince Priebus has tried to stop Trump's many visits with random aides, family, friends and reporters to the White House — which visually annoys the chief of staff — by filling up his schedule with ceremonial events, according to NYT.
  • Play time: Priebus has been busy making room in Trump's schedule to do whatever he wants. As NYT put it, "He has reduced the pace of public events and, like a Montessori teacher, modulates structured work time with the slack periods Mr. Trump craves."
  • Censoring polls: During the campaign, aides got used to digging up the two polls consistently favorable to him — Rasmussen and LA Times tracking poll, according to Swan.
  • The happy news: Staffers include positive, local news clippings in Trump's morning briefings instead of the possibly more negative headlines from a national paper, they told the Post.
  • The bad guys: When aides want to ensure someone doesn't get a job, they know to print out everything negative they've said about Trump. They know he's especially sensitive to disloyalty. This is partly what happened to Cathy McMorris with the interior secretary position.
  • No more tweets: Toward the end of the campaign, stories surfaced that aides had finally convinced Trump to let them handle Twitter.
  • Listen first: A confidante told Politico "If you're an adviser to him, your job is to help him at the margins. To talk him out of doing crazy things."
  • Simplifying: When it comes to making a policy or strategy decision, aides told Politico that it's best not to give Trump too many different options, but instead, thoroughly explain one, favored option and how the press would cover it. "You go in and tell him the pros and cons, and what the media coverage is going to be like."

Go deeper

Fauci says 100,000 to 200,000 Americans could die from coronavirus

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on CNN's "State of the Union" that models suggest the coronavirus will infect millions of Americans and could kill 100,000 to 200,000, though he stressed that the projections are "such a moving target."

Why it matters: Fauci has been the coronavirus task force's most outspoken advocate for emergency social distancing measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus, sometimes contradicting President Trump's more optimistic outlook.

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 681,706 — Total deaths: 31,882 — Total recoveries: 145,696.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 8 a.m. ET: 124,763 — Total deaths: 2,191 — Total recoveries: 2,612.
  3. Federal government latest: Trump announces new travel advisories for New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, but rules out quarantine enforcement. Per CDC, those residents should "refrain from non-essential domestic travel for 14 days," with the exception of critical infrastructure industry workers.
  4. State updates: Alaska issues a stay-at-home order — New York tries to nearly triple hospital capacity in less than a month and moves presidential primary to June 23.
  5. World updates: In Spain, over 1,400 people were confirmed dead between Thursday to Saturday.
  6. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  7. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Pelosi: "As the president fiddles, people are dying"

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ramped up her criticism of President Trump's coronavirus response on CNN"s "State of the Union" Sunday, claiming that his downplaying of the crisis has cost American lives.

The big picture: The U.S. is now reporting the most positive coronavirus cases in the world, with 124,686 confirmed as of Sunday morning. Pelosi argued on CNN that Trump's initial denial and subsequent delay in getting life-saving equipment to state governments have been "deadly."