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The Senate health care bill would raise premiums for older and lower-income Americans on exchanges compared to current law, much like the House bill, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Some younger people would pay less in premiums, but deductibles would likely rise across the board.

Expand chart
Data: Kaiser Family Foundation; Chart: Chris Canipe and Lazaro Gamio / Axios

What the Senate bill does:

  • Changes the benchmark plan — the one that's linked to the subsidies. Under the Affordable Care Act, subsidies are tied to "silver" plans that cover 70 percent of an enrollee's health care costs. Under the Senate bill, they're tied to plans that only cover 58 percent of the costs. This means subsidies will be smaller.
  • Changes the required income percentages enrollees must pay towards their premiums. Younger people would generally have to pay less of their income, but older people would have to pay more.
  • Allows older people to be charged premiums five times higher than younger people, compared to three times higher under current law.
  • Rewrites the eligibility rules. People would be eligible for subsidies if their incomes are below 350 percent of the federal poverty line, rather than between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty line under the ACA.

Why this matters: Premiums for silver plans would at worst become unaffordable for some people, while others would see their costs go up. This may make some people switch into bronze plans, but these plans have substantially higher deductibles. The bottom line is most Americans will pay more out of pocket for their health care on the individual market, and that's not politically popular.

Go deeper

20 mins ago - Health

America's new approach to masks is even more scattershot than before

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

In grocery stores and pizza joints, main streets and downtowns across the country, pandemic precautions range wildly — from nonexistent to 2020 deja vu.

The big picture: As COVID-19 cases surge, especially in states with low vaccination rates, the country is once again in the throes of a fraught cultural and political debate over face masks.

From gypsy moths to Audubon, nature names face racism test

Freshly hatched caterpillars of gypsy moths on the bark of a red oak. Photo: Sebastian Willnow/picture alliance via Getty Images

Bugs, birds, fish and plants with names linked to white supremacists may be renamed, as science confronts its own ties to systemic racism.

Why it matters: The national reckoning was inevitably going to pass this way. The sciences have long underrepresented and erected barriers of entry to people of color and there’s a concerted effort for a reset under way in academia, research and hiring.

First Afghan allies and their families arrive in the U.S.

Head of the US Central Command, General Kenneth McKenzie, speaks in the U.S. embassy compound in Kabul on July 25, 2021. Photo: Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

The first plane with more than 200 Afghans who served as interpreters, contractors or other ally roles for the U.S. military has arrived in the U.S. — the first of many such flights as troops are withdrawn from the region.

Why it matters: More than 700 Afghan allies and their families are preparing to be brought into the U.S. in the coming days on special immigrant visas. More than 70,000 Afghans have received those since 2008.