Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The House of Representatives voted 227-186 on Wednesday in favor of a resolution that would limit President Trump's ability to direct military action against Iran without authorization from Congress.

Why it matters: It's a bipartisan rebuke of the president's foreign policy toward Iran that has now been passed in both the House and Senate. The bill, which is expected to be vetoed by Trump, was first introduced in the wake of the president's decision to order a strike that killed Iranian Gen. Qasem Soleimani, bringing the U.S. to the brink of war with Iran.

Driving the news: Moments before the House passed the resolution, the Pentagon confirmed that two U.S. service members had been killed by a rocket attack in Iraq. Officials have not yet said who was responsible, but past rocket attacks of this sort have been attributed to Iranian-backed Shiite militias.

Between the lines: The House in January passed a "concurrent" war powers resolution, which does not have the force of law or go to the president's desk for a signature. "This is a statement of the Congress of the United States," Speaker Nancy Pelosi said at the time. "I will not have that statement diminished by having the president veto it or not."

  • The new measure is a more forceful "joint" resolution, meaning it can sent to Trump's desk to be enacted into law. Neither the House nor the Senate have the two-thirds majority necessary to override Trump's veto.

The big picture: This is not the first time bipartisan members of Congress have joined forces to rebuke Trump's Middle East policies. The Senate has passed resolutions calling on Trump to pull U.S. support from the Saudi-led coalition in the war in Yemen and blocking the administration's sale of arms to Saudi Arabia. Both were vetoed by Trump.

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Trump claims he made Juneteenth "very famous"

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump took credit for popularizing Juneteenth, the commemoration of the end of slavery in the U.S., in a wide-ranging interview with the Wall Street Journal Thursday, saying: "I did something good: I made Juneteenth very famous."

Driving the news: The president claimed that "nobody had ever heard" of the June 19 celebration before he planned a rally in Tulsa on that day. His campaign ultimately changed the date of the rally to June 20 after receiving pushback from African American leaders around the country.

Top Democrats express outrage at Bolton allegations, will consult on "next steps"

Bolton at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina on February 17. Photo: Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

House Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) said on Wednesday he plans to discuss "next steps" with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other top Democrats in light of new allegations in former national security adviser John Bolton's book about President Trump's misconduct in his dealings with foreign leaders.

Driving the news: Bolton writes in his upcoming memoir that House Democrats committed "impeachment malpractice" by not expanding their investigation beyond the Ukraine scandal to include other actions Trump allegedly took to solicit election help from foreign leaders.

Updated Jun 16, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump signs executive order on police reform

President Trump shows his signature on an Executive Order on Safe Policing for Safe Communities. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump signed a modest executive order on Tuesday that encourages limiting the use of chokeholds and moves to create a national database for police misconduct.

Why it matters: Top Trump aides recognize that he is under increased pressure to do something to address the mass outcry spurred by the killing of George Floyd. This order, which many lawmakers will say does not go far enough, is intended to send a message that Trump is willing to work with Congress on more meaningful reform.