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Attorney General William Barr. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday voted 24-17, along party lines, to authorize a subpoena compelling Attorney General William Barr to turn over special counsel Robert Mueller's "full and unredacted" report.

The big picture: Barr wrote in a letter to the committee that he would turn over a version of the report by mid-April, once he and Mueller finished redacting it for "grand jury information, classified information, information related to ongoing prosecutions, and information that may unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties." But Democrats have demanded that Barr provide the full 400-page report, along with underlying evidence, for the sake of transparency.

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler said that he would give Barr "time to change his mind," but that the subpoena would be served if he does not voluntarily comply.

"This committee requires the full report and the underlying materials because it is our job, not the attorney general's to determine whether or not President Trump has abused his office. We require the report because one day, one way or another, the country will move on from President Trump. We must make it harder for future presidents to behave in this way."

The other side: Ranking member Doug Collins (R-Ga.) slammed the Democrats' efforts to subpoena the report as "political theatre."

"The attorney general's entire mandate is to enforce the law and he's expressly forbidden from providing grand jury material outside of the department, with very limited and narrow exceptions. Congress is not one of those exceptions, and the chairman knows it."

Worth noting: On March 14, the House voted 420-0 in favor of a resolution calling for the Justice Department to release the full Mueller report.

What's next: If Barr ignores or rejects the subpoena, it could result in an extended court fight: "We will, as appropriate, go to court. We think we need a subpoena first," Nadler said. Barr has said he will be available to testify publicly to the committee about the findings in the report on May 1, but Democrats have demanded that he appear sooner.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat — Study: Trump campaign rallies likely led to over 700 COVID-related deaths.
  2. World: Boris Johnson announces month-long lockdown in England — Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike — Austria reimposes coronavirus lockdowns amid surge of infections.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  5. States: New York rolls out new testing requirements for visitors.

North Carolina police pepper-spray protesters marching to the polls

Officers in North Carolina used pepper spray on protesters and arrested eight people at a get-out-the-vote rally at Alamance County’s courthouse Saturday during the final day of early voting, the City of Graham Police Department confirmed.

Driving the news: The peaceful "I Am Change" march to the polls was organized by Rev. Greg Drumwright, from the Citadel Church in Greensboro, N.C., and included a minute's silence for George Floyd. Melanie Mitchell told the News & Observer her daughters, age 5 and 11, were among those pepper-sprayed by police soon after.

6 hours ago - Health

Boris Johnson announces month-long COVID-19 lockdown in England

Prime Minsiter Boris Johnson. Photo: NurPhoto / Getty Images

A new national lockdown will be imposed in England, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced Saturday, as the number of COVID-19 cases in the country topped 1 million.

Details: Starting Thursday, people in England must stay at home, and bars and restaurants will close, except for takeout and deliveries. All non-essential retail will also be shuttered. Different households will be banned from mixing indoors. International travel, unless for business purposes, will be banned. The new measures will last through at least December 2.