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Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Attorney General William Barr said in a letter to Congress on Friday afternoon that the nearly 400-page Mueller investigation report will not be shared with the White House before it is submitted to Congress, once properly redacted, aiming for mid-April or before.

Details: Barr wrote in a letter to the chairs of the Senate and House Judiciary: "Everyone will soon be able to read [the report] on their own. I do not believe it in the public's interest for me to attempt to summarize." He said will be available to testify publicly to the committee about the findings in the report on May 1, and also clarified that his initial letter about Mueller's "principal conclusions" was not intended to be an exhaustive summary of the investigation.

Barr said that he and special counsel Mueller would redact information that falls into the following categories.

  • Material subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure (6e) that cannot be made public.
  • Material the intelligence community identifies as potentially compromising sensitive sources and methods.
  • Material that could affect other ongoing matters, including those that the special counsel has referred to other Department offices.
  • Information that would unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties.

Read Barr's letter:

Dear Chairman Graham and Chairman Nadler,
I write in response to Chairman Nadler's March 25, 2019 letter and Chairman Graham's March 27, 2019 letter, which addressed the investigation of Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller, III, and the "confidential report" he has submitted to me pursuant to 28 C.F.F. § 600.8(c).
As we have discussed, I share your desire to ensure that Congress and the public have the opportunity to read the Special Counsel's report. We are preparing the report for release, making the redactions that are required. The SpecialCounsel is assisting us in the process. Specifically, we are well along in the process of identifying and redacting the following: (1) material subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6(e) that by law cannot be made public; (2) material the intelligence community identifies as potentially compromising sensitive sources methods; (3) material that could affect other ongoing matters, including those that the Special Counsel has referred to other Department offices; and (4) information that would unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties. Our progress is such that I anticipate we will be in a position to release the report by mid-April, if not sooner. Although the President would have the right to assert privilege over certain parts of the report, he has stated publicly that he intends to defer to me, and, accordingly, there are no plans to submit the report to the White House for a privilege review.
Also, I am aware of some media reports and other public statements mischaracterizing my March 24, 2019 supplemental notification as a "summary" of the Special Counsel's investigation and report. For example, Chairman Nadler's March 25 letter refers to my supplemental notification as a "four-page summary of the Special Counsel's review." My March 24 letter was not, and did not purport to be, an exhaustive recounting of the Special Counsel's investigation or report. As my letter made clear, my notification to Congress and the public provided, pending release of the report, a summary of its "principal conclusions" - that is, its bottom line. The Special Counsel's report is nearly 400 pages long (exclusive of tables and appendices) and sets forth the Special Counsel's findings, his analysis, and the reasons for his conclusions. Everyone will soon be able to read it on their own. I do not believe it would be in the public's interest for me to attempt to summarize the full report or release it in serial or piecemeal fashion.
As I have discussed with both of you, I believe it would be appropriate for me to testify publicly on behalf of the Department shortly after the Special Counsel's report is made public. I am currently available to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on May 1, 2019 and before the House Judiciary Committee on May 2, 2019.
Finally, in the interests of keeping the public informed as to these matters, I intend to make this letter public after delivering to you.
Sincerely,
William P. Barr
Attorney General

The state of play: In response, Nadler released a statement confirming that "Congress requires the. full and complete Mueller report, without redactions, as well as access to the underlying evidence, by April 2. That deadline still stands."

Go deeper

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1 hour ago - Economy & Business

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When Mailchimp recently agreed to be acquired by Intuit for $12 billion, we noted how it was the richest sale ever of a private bootstrapped company. Now we know more about why the Atlanta-based email marketing company never took outside funding.

The big picture: Mailchimp founder and CEO Ben Chestnut tells Axios that it was all about timing.

"Noticias Telemundo" names Julio Vaqueiro as new anchor

Julio Vaqueiro. Photo: Noticias Telemundo

Emmy award-winning journalist Julio Vaqueiro will become the new anchor of "Noticias Telemundo," the network's daily Spanish-language evening newscast, Noticias Telemundo announced Thursday.

The big picture: Vaqueiro replaces José Díaz-Balart, who is returning to MSNBC later this month to host a new show as NBC seeks to add more diverse voices to its English-language news programs.

Al Gore's Climate TRACE finds vast undercounts of emissions

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A high-tech independent effort to track greenhouse gas emissions from every country, industrial facility and power plant announced its first results on Monday.

Why it matters: Climate TRACE utilizes satellite data, machine learning and artificial intelligence to determine greenhouse gas emissions globally. It aims usher in an era of "radical transparency" and a more enforceable climate agreement by giving nonprofits, governments and the UN actionable intelligence to track and crack down on polluters.