House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler joined ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) in calling for special counsel Robert Mueller to testify before the committee after Congress receives his full report and hears from Attorney General William Barr.

"Today, Ranking Member Collins called for Special Counsel Mueller to appear before the House Judiciary Committee. I fully agree. Special Counsel Mueller should come before the Committee to answer questions in public about his 22 month investigation into President Trump and his associates. In order to ask Special Counsel Mueller the right questions, the Committee must receive the Special Counsel’s full report and hear from Attorney General Barr about that report on May 2. We look forward to hearing from Mr. Mueller at the appropriate time."

The backdrop: Earlier on Monday, Collins published a letter criticizing Democrats' attempts to subpoena the unredacted report, writing on Twitter: "Democrats can cite no precedent for their demands for grand jury information from the #MuellerReport, but there’s a solution we should all be able to agree on: The Judiciary Committee should invite the Special Counsel to testify immediately."

  • Collins said that Mueller should testify the week of April 22. The House is expected to be on recess that week, but Collins wrote: "I think we can agree this business is too important to wait, and Members of the Committee will surely return to Washington at such a critical moment in our country's history."

The big picture: Barr, who is currently working with Mueller to redact the 400-page report, has agreed to testify before the committee on May 2, though Democrats have called on him to appear sooner. Mueller has not made any public statements about the report or his plans to testify, but a public appearance before Congress would be a must-watch political spectacle for those who have closely followed the 2-year investigation.

Go deeper: House Judiciary Committee authorizes subpoena for full Mueller report

Go deeper

Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Roger Stone arriving at his sentencing hearing on Feb. 20. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, according to two senior administration officials. Stone in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

Why it matters: The controversial move brings an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars. He had been scheduled to report to prison on July 14.

Updated 9 hours ago - Health

Which states have set single-day coronavirus records this week

Data: COVID Tracking Project and state health department data compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti and Naema Ahmed/Axios

13 states this week surpassed records set just last week for their highest number of coronavirus infections in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project and state health department data. 16 states in total reported new highs.

The big picture: The United States' alarming rise in coronavirus cases isn't just due to increased testing — particularly where the number of cases has grown fastest over the last month, Axios' Andrew Witherspoon and Caitlin Owens report.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 12,389,660 — Total deaths: 557,279 — Total recoveries — 6,830,596Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 3,169,611 — Total deaths: 133,885 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,856,341Map.
  3. Public health: The reality of the coronavirus bites.
  4. Trade: Trump says he's no longer considering phase-two trade deal with China because the pandemic damaged the two countries' relationship.
  5. 🎧 Podcast: Rural America has its own coronavirus problem.