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Photo by Mandel Ngan/Pool via Getty Images

Instead of just one report coming out of the House Judiciary Committee's year-long tech antitrust probe, there will likely be one from the Democratic majority and two from Republicans.

Why it matters: The latest developments blunt the likelihood that the parties can come together to rewrite antitrust laws for the digital economy, which Republican and Democratic policymakers alike have said they want to do.

The state of play: Democrats are still committed to soon releasing their own report, to include findings of their investigation into competition in digital markets as well as likely legislative proposals on how antitrust laws should be updated.

Yes, but: That may be coming without GOP support. Lead Judiciary Republican Rep. Jim Jordan will instead be releasing a separate report focusing on allegations of conservative bias by tech platforms, a Republican aide told Axios.

Meanwhile: Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.) won't be signing onto the Democrats' report either, despite agreeing with many of its conclusions, and will be releasing a response he's calling "The Third Way," he told Axios on Tuesday.

  • "I agree with about 330 pages of the majority report, that these tech companies have been acting anti-competitively," he said. "It's very common for Republicans and Democrats to agree on a problem and offer different solutions to solve a problem."
  • Republican Reps. Matt Gaetz and Doug Collins are also signing onto Buck's response, a source familiar with the matter told Axios.

Between the lines: Buck maintains the releases aren't competing reports per se, but separate products of a bipartisan exercise. "I'm really proud to be included in the process, and I think other Republicans are also," he said.

Our thought bubble: The end result as far as the general public is concerned will still ultimately be three separate reports illustrating the partisan cracks that have been apparent throughout this process.

Go deeper

Nov 22, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Republicans quietly plot to sink Biden nominees

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Republicans are making plans to torpedo some of President-elect Biden's prospective Cabinet, agency and judicial nominees if the GOP keeps its majority, aides involved in the discussions tell me.

What we're hearing: Top targets include political names and civil servants who spoke out loudest against President Trump, forced out his appointees or became stars in the impeachment hearings — like Sally Yates and Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman — as well as longtime targets of conservative media, like Susan Rice.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

Former Georgia Gov. Roy Barnes on the Senate runoffs

The future of U.S. politics, and all that flows from it, is in the hands of Georgia voters when they vote in two Senate runoffs on January 5.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the election dynamics with former Georgia Gov. Roy Barnes, a Democrat who served between 1999 and 2003.

2 hours ago - Health

Cuomo orders emergency hospital protocols as COVID capacity dwindles

Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Photo: Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that struggling state hospital systems must transfer patients to sites that are not nearing capacity, as rising coronavirus cases and hospitalizations strain medical resources.

Why it matters: New York does not expect to get the same kind of help from thousands of out-of-state doctors and nurses that it got this spring, Cuomo acknowledged, as most of the country battles skyrocketing COVID hospitalizations and infections.