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House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler speaks to reporters July 26. Photo: Caroline Brehman/Getty Images

The House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees on Thursday sent letters demanding information on "multiple efforts" by the president, vice president and other administration officials to spend taxpayer dollars at properties owned by the Trump Organization, according to the AP.

Why it matters: House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) said in a statement that the, "Potential violations of the Foreign and Domestic Emoluments Clauses of the Constitution are of grave concern to the Committee..." and its members are now weighing whether to recommend articles of impeachment.

Context: The letters came less than a week after Vice President Pence stayed at the Trump International Golf Club in Doonbeg, Ireland, though his meeting with Irish officials was 180 miles away in Dublin. Pence's trip followed President Trump's late August proposal to host the 2020 G7 summit at his Miami golf resort, where revenues have dropped since Trump took office.

The big picture: House Democrats are attempting to keep the public tuned into open-ended investigations of Trump and his administration.

  • Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, a member of the Judiciary panel, told the AP that they "have been focused on the Mueller report and that is a very small part of the overall picture. We must get America focused on the ongoing violations against basic Constitutional principles.”

Details: In the letter sent to Pence's chief of staff, House Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings wrote:

"The White House has not made public how much the Vice President's trip cost the American Taxpayer⁠—or benefited the Trump Organization—but based on previous investigations by the Government Accountability Office, the bill could be significant."
"President Trump stayed at his property in Doonbeg in June, which cost the American people an estimated $3.6 million."

Go deeper

2 hours ago - World

Special report: Trump's U.S.-China transformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump began his term by launching the trade war with China he had promised on the campaign trail. By mid-2020, however, Trump was no longer the public face of China policy-making as he became increasingly consumed with domestic troubles, giving his top aides carte blanche to pursue a cascade of tough-on-China policies.

Why it matters: Trump alone did not reshape the China relationship. But his trade war shattered global norms, paving the way for administration officials to pursue policies that just a few years earlier would have been unthinkable.

McConnell: Trump "provoked" Capitol mob

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the pro-Trump mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was "provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Why it matters: Trump was impeached by the House last week for "incitement of insurrection." McConnell has not said how he will vote in Trump's coming Senate impeachment trial, but sources told Axios' Mike Allen that the chances of him voting to convict are higher than 50%.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

GOP leaders skip Trump sendoff in favor of church with Biden

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) in July. Photo by Erin Scott-Pool/Getty Images

Congressional leaders, including House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, will skip President Trump's departure ceremony in Maryland tomorrow morning in favor of attending mass with incoming President Joe Biden ahead of his inauguration, congressional sources familiar with their plans tell Axios.

Why it matters: Their decision is a clear sign of unity before Biden takes the oath of office.