Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Unlike their reluctance on impeachment, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the House Democratic leadership were eager to make a public spectacle of President Trump's racist comments.

What happened: In a blistering floor speech, Pelosi described Trump's tweets as "disgraceful," "disgusting," and "racist," prompting Georgia Republican Rep. Doug Collins to demand her words be "taken down."

  • By House precedent, "References to racial or other discrimination on the part of the President are not in order."
  • A fiery, two-hour showdown between Democrats and Republicans ensued, with the House ultimately voting largely along party lines not to strike Pelosi's words from the record.
  • House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy, who had defended Trump's tweets earlier in the day, told Axios: "What we just saw today was a very sad day in this House. Probably a historic day. ... The very person who is supposed to uphold the rules broke the rule."

For history ... WASHINGTON (AP) — Divided House votes to condemn Trump's "racist" tweets against Democratic congresswomen of color, over GOP opposition.

  • The four Republicans who voted to condemn Trump's remarks: Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Fred Upton of Michigan, Will Hurd of Texas and Susan Brooks of Indiana, who is retiring.
  • Also backing the measure was Michigan's independent Rep. Justin Amash, who left the GOP this month. (AP)

The bottom line: The chaotic scene underscores deep divisions within Congress over when, if ever, to hold Trump accountable.

Go deeper: Trump's premeditated racism is central to his 2020 strategy

Go deeper

1 hour ago - World

Lebanon information minister resigns days after deadly explosion

Anti-government protesters in Beirut. Photo: STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Lebanon’s information minister resigned on Sunday in the wake of mass protests over the deadly blast in Beirut's port last week, which has killed at least 160 people and injured nearly 6,000, AP reports.

Why it matters: In her resignation letter, Manal Abdel-Samad called change "elusive" and apologized for not delivering more to the country, which had been devastated by a financial crisis and the coronavirus pandemic even before the blast destroyed much of the capital city.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 19,655,445 — Total deaths: 727,353 — Total recoveries — 11,950,845Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 4,998,802 — Total deaths: 162,425 — Total recoveries: 1,643,118 — Total tests: 61,080,587Map.
  3. Politics: Trump signs 4 executive actions on coronavirus aid — Democrats, and some Republicans, criticize the move.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective — 1 in 3 Americans would decline COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  6. Schools: How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.

Elevator anxiety will stifle reopenings

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Will you step back into an elevator any time soon?

Why it matters: Tens of billions of dollars — and the future of cities around the country — rest on the answer to that question. So long as workers remain unwilling to take elevators, hundreds of billions of dollars' worth of office real estate will continue to go largely unused.