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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

More than one in five U.S. hospitals don't have enough workers right now as hospitals fill up with coronavirus patients, especially in the Midwest, The Atlantic reports.

Why it matters: Even though doctors have gotten better at treating the virus, all that progress doesn't matter if there's no one to deliver care to a patient.

What's happening: The U.S. is setting new coronavirus hospitalization records, with 73,000 patients hospitalized this week.

  • During the week of Nov. 4 to Nov. 11, 19% of American hospitals faced a staffing shortage. This week, 22% of hospitals said they expect a shortage, according to data provided to The Atlantic by the Department of Health and Human Services.
  • In some states, the situation is worse: More than 35% of hospitals in Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wisconsin are anticipating a staffing shortage this week.

Between the lines: The shortages are due to staff members getting sick or exposed to the virus, thus having to quarantine, and to more patients arriving at the hospital seeking care.

What we're watching: The COVID Tracking Project, which is a project of The Atlantic, has found that an increase in cases translates into an increase in hospitalizations about 12 days later.

  • That means that hospitals' problems are about to get a lot worse. Over the last 12 days, the seven-day average of new cases has increased from less than 90,000 a day to 150,000 a day.

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
18 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus hotspots far outpacing Europe's

Data: CSSE Johns Hopkins University, Census Bureau, United Nations; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

America's coronavirus outbreak has surpassed Europe's.

Why it matters: It wasn't long ago that public health experts were pointing to Europe as a warning sign for the U.S. But the U.S. now has a higher per capita caseload than the EU ever has during its recent surge.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Vaccines: Key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines — Oxford and AstraZeneca's vaccine won't just go to rich countries.
  2. Health: U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations keep breaking recordsWhy we're numb to 250,000 deaths.
  3. World: England to impose stricter regional systemU.S. hotspots far outpacing Europe's — Portugal to ban domestic travel for national holidays.
  4. Economy: The biggest pandemic labor market drags.
  5. Sports: Coronavirus precautions leave college basketball schedule in flux.
21 hours ago - Politics & Policy

California governor and family in quarantine after coronavirus exposure

California Gov. Gavin Newsom. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) tweeted late Sunday that he and his family are quarantining after being exposed to COVID-19.

Details: Newsom said they learned Friday that three of his children had come into contact with a California Highway Patrol officer who tested positive for the coronavirus. "Thankfully, the entire family tested negative today," Newsom said.