Riot police push protesters while attending to a wounded police agent in Sha Tin, Hong Kong. Photo: Ivan Abreu/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Hong Kong businesses are questioning if the city is safe after almost 3 months of protests, while others are being advised to create contingency plans if unrest continues, the BBC reports.

The big picture: Hong Kong's stock market is the 5th largest in the world, when considering the value of its traded companies. As of July, financial analysts said the territory's market hadn't yet suffered serious consequences — but regulatory changes caused by protests would be a different story entirely.

  • Some clients of law firm Harris Bricken are already turning away from Hong Kong — or asking how they can "lower their footprint" in the city, per the BBC.
  • Hong Kong's economy "will struggle to expand at all this year," according to a Thursday statement from Paul Chan, the city's financial secretary, Bloomberg reports. A stimulus package worth over $2 billion is in the works, according to Chan.

What's happening: Pro-democracy protesters have accused Hong Kong police of brutality and faced tear gas, rubber bullets and officers disguised as anti-government protesters.

  • Some protesters issued apologies this weekojectile on Aug. 11, causing a bloody scene that protesters blamed police for, per the Washington Post.
  • Some protestors issued apologies this week after demonstrations in Hong Kong International Airport devolved into "hand-to-hand clashes with riot police," the Post reports.

Go deeper: Investors worry Hong Kong protests could hurt business

Go deeper

Updated 10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 32,746,147 — Total deaths: 991,678 — Total recoveries: 22,588,064Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 7,007,450 — Total deaths: 204,486 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.
Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

What they're saying: Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading political figures reacted to President Trump's Saturday afternoon nomination of federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

What they're saying: "President Trump could not have made a better decision," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement. "Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States."

Amy Coney Barrett: "Should I be confirmed, I will be mindful of who came before me"

Trump introduces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Olivier Douleiry/Getty Images

In speaking after President Trump announced her as the Supreme Court nominee to replaced Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Saturday she will be "mindful" of those who came before her on the court if confirmed.

What she's saying: Barrett touched on Ginsburg's legacy, as well as her own judicial philosophy and family values. "I love the United States and I love the United States Constitution," she said. "I'm truly humbled at the prospect of serving on the  Supreme Court."