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Riot police push protesters while attending to a wounded police agent in Sha Tin, Hong Kong. Photo: Ivan Abreu/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Hong Kong businesses are questioning if the city is safe after almost 3 months of protests, while others are being advised to create contingency plans if unrest continues, the BBC reports.

The big picture: Hong Kong's stock market is the 5th largest in the world, when considering the value of its traded companies. As of July, financial analysts said the territory's market hadn't yet suffered serious consequences — but regulatory changes caused by protests would be a different story entirely.

  • Some clients of law firm Harris Bricken are already turning away from Hong Kong — or asking how they can "lower their footprint" in the city, per the BBC.
  • Hong Kong's economy "will struggle to expand at all this year," according to a Thursday statement from Paul Chan, the city's financial secretary, Bloomberg reports. A stimulus package worth over $2 billion is in the works, according to Chan.

What's happening: Pro-democracy protesters have accused Hong Kong police of brutality and faced tear gas, rubber bullets and officers disguised as anti-government protesters.

  • Some protesters issued apologies this weekojectile on Aug. 11, causing a bloody scene that protesters blamed police for, per the Washington Post.
  • Some protestors issued apologies this week after demonstrations in Hong Kong International Airport devolved into "hand-to-hand clashes with riot police," the Post reports.

Go deeper: Investors worry Hong Kong protests could hurt business

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.