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Police detain a woman during a flash mob to block roads in the Central district in Hong Kong on Wednesday. Photo: Dale De La Rey/AFP via Getty Images

Hong Kong closed all schools including kindergartens Wednesday as protests paralyzed the city for a third day, the BBC reports.

What's happening: Many business and some public transport services also closed as riot police clashed with some protesters in parts of the Asian financial hub, Reuters notes.

  • After running battles with demonstrators over Tuesday night, riot police were seen using batons on some Hong Kongers and wrestling others to the ground near the Chinese territory's stock exchange, per Reuters.

What they're saying: "Our society has been pushed to the brink of a total breakdown," Senior Police Superintendent Kong Wing-heung said late Tuesday, AP reports. "Masked rioters have lost control and committed insane acts like throwing trash, bicycles and large objects onto MTR tracks, hanging trash on overhead power lines."

Driving the news: Months of unrest escalated this week. On Monday, a protester was shot by police who opened fire on demonstrators during clashes in the city at the start of rush hour on Monday Morning.

The big picture: Authorities hoped the October withdrawal of an extradition bill that triggered the city's protests would quell the unrest. However, protesters are concerned that China may quash the high degree of autonomy they've enjoyed since the former British colony was returned to the country in 1997.

Go deeper: Violence in Hong Kong as leader denounces "enemies of the people"

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

NRA files for bankruptcy, says it will reincorporate in Texas

Wayne LaPierre of the National Rifle Association (NRA) speaks during CPAC in 2016. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The National Rifle Association said Friday it has filed for voluntary bankruptcy as part of a restructuring plan.

Driving the news: The gun rights group said it would reincorporate in Texas, calling New York, where it is currently registered, a "toxic political environment." Last year, New York Attorney General Letitia James filed a lawsuit to dissolve the NRA, alleging the group committed fraud by diverting roughly $64 million in charitable donations over three years to support reckless spending by its executives.

54 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden: "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution

Joe Biden. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden promised to invoke the Defense Production Act to increase vaccine manufacturing, as he outlined a five-point plan to administer 100 million COVID-19 vaccinations in the first months of his presidency.

Why it matters: With the Center for Disease Control and Prevention warning of a more contagious variant of the coronavirus, Biden is trying to establish how he’ll approach the pandemic differently than President Trump.

A new Washington

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Image

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Friday that the city should expect a "new normal" for security — even after President-elect Biden's inauguration.

The state of play: Inaugurations are usually a point of celebration in D.C., but over 20,000 troops are now patrolling Washington streets in an unprecedented preparation for Biden's swearing-in on Jan. 20.