Updated Nov 13, 2019

Hong Kong closes all schools as protests cripple city

Police detain a woman during a flash mob to block roads in the Central district in Hong Kong on Wednesday. Photo: Dale De La Rey/AFP via Getty Images

Hong Kong closed all schools including kindergartens Wednesday as protests paralyzed the city for a third day, the BBC reports.

What's happening: Many business and some public transport services also closed as riot police clashed with some protesters in parts of the Asian financial hub, Reuters notes.

  • After running battles with demonstrators over Tuesday night, riot police were seen using batons on some Hong Kongers and wrestling others to the ground near the Chinese territory's stock exchange, per Reuters.

What they're saying: "Our society has been pushed to the brink of a total breakdown," Senior Police Superintendent Kong Wing-heung said late Tuesday, AP reports. "Masked rioters have lost control and committed insane acts like throwing trash, bicycles and large objects onto MTR tracks, hanging trash on overhead power lines."

Driving the news: Months of unrest escalated this week. On Monday, a protester was shot by police who opened fire on demonstrators during clashes in the city at the start of rush hour on Monday Morning.

The big picture: Authorities hoped the October withdrawal of an extradition bill that triggered the city's protests would quell the unrest. However, protesters are concerned that China may quash the high degree of autonomy they've enjoyed since the former British colony was returned to the country in 1997.

Go deeper: Violence in Hong Kong as leader denounces "enemies of the people"

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Zuckerberg says Trump’s “shooting” tweet didn’t violate Facebook’s rules

Mark Zuckerberg at the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15. Photo: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Facebook did not remove President Trump's threat to send the National Guard to Minneapolis because the company's policy on inciting violence allows discussion on state use of force, CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a post on Friday.

The big picture: Zuckerberg's statement comes on the heels of leaked internal criticism from Facebook employees over how the company handled Trump's posts about the Minneapolis protests and his unsubstantiated claims on mail-in ballots — both of which Twitter has now taken action on.

Updated 34 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 5,916,464— Total deaths: 364,357 — Total recoveries — 2,468,634Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 1,744,258 — Total deaths: 102,709 — Total recoveries: 406,446 — Total tested: 16,099,515Map.
  3. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  4. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  5. Business: Fed chair Powell says coronavirus is "great increaser" of income inequality.
  6. 1 sports thing: NCAA outlines plan to get athletes back to campus.

Trump says he spoke with George Floyd's family

President Trump in the Rose Garden on May 29. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Friday that he had spoken with the family of George Floyd, a black resident of Minneapolis who died after a police officer knelt on his neck on Monday.

Driving the news: Former Vice President Joe Biden said via livestream a few hours earlier that he, too, had spoken with Floyd's family. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee implored white Americans to consider systemic injustices against African Americans more broadly, Axios' Alexi McCammond reports.