Dec 1, 2019

Thousands march in Hong Kong after landslide election victories

A police officer stands guard as pro-democracy protesters march, Dec. 1. Photo: Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Thousands of people in Hong Kong marched to the U.S. Consulate on Sunday in a show of thanks to Congress and President Trump for passing and signing a law supporting their cause last week. Riot police responded with canisters of tear gas and rubber bullets after demonstrators threw bricks and smoke bombs, AP reports.

The big picture: The marches ended a brief lull in demonstrations after the region held elections for its district council, which saw pro-democracy candidates win a landslide victory. Some protesters said the marches were necessary to pressure city leader Carrie Lam to make concessions, as she has only accepted one of their five demands thus far — the withdrawal of the extradition bill that set off the months-long crisis.

In photos
A protester holds a sign, Dec. 1. Photo: Chris McGrath/Getty Images
A protester wearing a Trump mask, Dec. 1. Photo: Chris McGrath/Getty Images
People march at the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong, Dec. 1. Photo: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images
People march at the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong, Dec. 1. Photo: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images
People march to the US Consulate in Hong Kong, Dec. 1. Photo: Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Hong Kong protests show no signs of slowing as movement enters 6th month

Pro-democracy protesters march in Hong Kong. Photo: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

Tens of thousands of people gathered in Hong Kong on Sunday for some of the largest anti-government demonstrations in weeks, timed to coincide with international Human Rights Day on Dec. 10, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The marches, which continue to be aimed at pressuring Chief Executive Carrie Lam into accepting democratic election reforms and an amnesty for arrested protesters, mark the sixth month of pro-democracy demonstrations. The notably peaceful protest was organized by Civil Human Rights Front, the first time the group has received police authorization to hold a march since August.

Go deeperArrowDec 8, 2019

Trump signs bill expressing support for Hong Kong protesters

Photo: Xinhua/Li Xueren and Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

President Trump signed the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act on Wednesday, reaffirming U.S. support for the city's autonomy after months of pro-democracy protests.

Why it matters: The bill, which was passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in both the Senate and the House, serves as a major rebuke of China at a time when Washington and Beijing are engaged in critical trade talks. China has warned that it will take retaliatory measures if the bill becomes law.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Nov 27, 2019

Finger-pointing over misjudging Hong Kong

Anti-government protesters shine phone lights at police as they chant slogans in Hong Kong yesterday. Photo: Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Top Chinese leaders, including Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, "have been managing their response" to the violent protests in Hong Kong from a villa in Shenzhen instead of using the formal bureaucratic system that's been in place for two decades, Reuters scoops.

Why it matters: Under normal circumstances, Beijing and Hong Kong communicate through the Liaison Office, "housed in a Hong Kong skyscraper stacked with surveillance cameras, ringed by steel barricades," Reuters writes. This change shows the central government isn't happy with how the Liaison Office has been handling the protests.

Go deeperArrowNov 26, 2019