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Hogan Gidley. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

White House spokesman Hogan Gidley will leave his post to become the national press secretary for President Trump's re-election campaign, per sources with direct knowledge.

The big picture: Gidley, who has been serving as principal deputy press secretary, will join the campaign’s communications staff which is headed by Tim Murtaugh. He will fill the role previously held by Kayleigh McEnany, who is now White House press secretary.

The backdrop: A nearly two-decade veteran of conservative politics, Gidley joined the White House in October 2017. Before that, he was a contributor to CBS News, and served in top communications roles for Republican presidential candidates Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum.

  • In a White House in which the president likes to see his staffers on TV, Gidley grabbed Trump’s attention early on with frequent appearances on "Fox & Friends." He helped himself internally by building a strong relationship with the president's son-in-law, Jared Kushner.
  • The New York Times' Mike Leibovich profiled Gidley back in 2018, working under then-press secretary Sarah Sanders, painting a picture of a character with a penchant for Muscle Milk and natty dress.
  • But the profile also captured how Gidley‘s adeptness at survival in the administration thanks in part to his willingness to adamantly promote and defend Trump on TV.

What they're saying: "Hogan Gidley will be leaving the White House on July 1 and heading over to my campaign to be the National Press Secretary," Trump tweeted Tuesday. "He is a strong, loyal and trusted member of the team that I know will do an outstanding job! We must WIN this election!"

  • Jared Kushner, a Trump adviser and the president's son-in-law, said that Gidley's "two decades of prior campaign experience combined with his deep knowledge of the administration make him an invaluable addition" to the campaign.

Go deeper

Sep 20, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump campaign goes all in on Pennsylvania

Trump poster in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Photo: Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

The president's campaign is placing more importance on Pennsylvania amid growing concern that his chances of clinching Wisconsin are slipping, Trump campaign sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Pennsylvania, which has 20 electoral votes, twice Wisconsin's number, actually has been trending higher in recent public and internal polling, a welcome development for the campaign.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.