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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks onstage in New York City in 2020. Photo: Monica Schipper/Getty Images for Hulu

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told CNN Sunday the U.S. has to focus on "two huge consequences" following President Biden's decision to withdraw American troops from Afghanistan.

Driving the news: Axios reported Friday that Clinton and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice expressed concern to the House Foreign Affairs Committee over the move. When CNN's Fareed Zakaria asked Clinton what she thought of the decision, she said: "Well, it's been made, and I know it is a very difficult decision."

What else she's saying: The first major consequence was "the potential collapse of the Afghan government and a takeover of Afghanistan by the Taliban," Clinton said.

  • "Probably with a resumption of civil war in certain parts of the country, but a largely Taliban-run government at some point in the not-too-distant future," she added.
  • Clinton said it's important to protect the "many thousands of Afghans" who worked with the U.S. and NATO, "who stood up and spoke out for women’s rights and human rights." She expressed hopes a visa program could be set up for them in the U.S.
"There will also be, I fear, a huge refugee outflow," she said. "And of course, the second big set of problems revolves around a resumption of activities by global terrorist groups, most particularly Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State."

The bottom line: "It's one thing to pull out troops that have been supporting security in Afghanistan, supporting the Afghan military, leaving it pretty much to fend for itself, but we can’t afford to walk away from the consequences of that decision," Clinton said.

  • The Biden administration did not immediately respond to Axios' request for comment.

Go deeper: Biden administration's hard exit from Afghanistan

Go deeper

May 1, 2021 - World

Taliban threatens to attack U.S. troops as Trump withdrawal date passes

Afghanistan security personnel on May 1 inspecting the site of a vehicle bombing that killed at least 25 people Logar Province, Afghanistan. Photo: Haroon Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Taliban threatened to launch attacks on U.S. and NATO troops on Saturday as the May 1 deadline for the complete withdrawal of foreign troops brokered by the Trump administration came and went.

Why it matters: President Biden announced last month that the U.S. would begin withdrawing troops from the country on May 1 but would not finish until Sept. 11, and the Taliban in response vowed to resume attacks on U.S. and NATO personnel.

Dave Lawler, author of World
May 1, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Hard exit from Afghanistan

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The biggest foreign policy surprise from President Biden’s first 100 days was his decision to act on a promise his predecessors hadn't: the full U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Why it matters: Biden didn't settle on an unconditional withdrawal because he saw a path to a stable Afghanistan without U.S. troops in the country. Instead, he argued that it was clear by now that no such path existed with them there.

CDC says fully vaccinated people don't have to wear masks indoors

CDC Director Rochelle Walensky. Photo: Erin Clark-Pool/Getty Images

The CDC announced in new guidance Thursday that anyone who is fully vaccinated can participate in indoor and outdoor activities without wearing a mask or physically distancing, regardless of crowd size.

What they're saying: "If you are fully vaccinated, you are protected, and you can start doing the things that you stopped doing because of the pandemic," CDC Director Rochelle Walensky will say at a White House press briefing.