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Hillary Clinton: "I'm now back" for the resistance


Hillary Clinton interviewed today at the Women for Women International Conference in New York City. In the span of a few minutes, she took "personal responsibility" for her 2016 loss, while also blaming her defeat on WikiLeaks and FBI Director Jim Comey.

Highlights below:

  1. "I am writing a book, and it is a painful process reliving the campaign."
  2. "I take absolute personal responsibility. I was the candidate. I was the person on the ballot."
  3. "I was on the way to winning until a combination of Jim Comey's letter on October 28 and Russian WikiLeaks raised doubts in the minds of people who were inclined to vote for me but were scared off."
  4. Putin "certainly hurt me."
  5. Electing the first female president "would have been a really big deal...There were important messages that could have sent."
  6. "I'm back to being...part of the resistance."
  7. On Trump's Syria strikes: "I don't know what kind of potentially back room deals were made with the Russians," but Clinton said she "did support" the strike, although not publicly.
  8. "I am going to publicly request that this administration not end our efforts making women's rights...central to American foreign policy..."
  9. "One of the you ask people what was your last pay. If you're a woman and you've been underpaid before…it looks fair, but it's not. Because you've got built in inequity"
  10. Artificial intelligence will be "upending the economy."

Read next: The thinking behind Trump's government "shutdown" tweets

After that: 10 big broken promises of past presidents

Alternately: Bernie's pollster says Le Pen can win

Finally: Trump admin. cuts school healthy lunch guidelines

Kim Hart 5 hours ago
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Tech's terrible week

A sad computer
Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

From a fatal car crash to a data nightmare, turning-point scenarios played out in several corners of the technology industry this week.

Why it matters: The utopian promise of technological progress is giving way to the very thorny challenges of balancing innovation with social accountability. That means congressional hearings, investigations, probably at least some regulation — and a lot more skepticism about the promise of the tech-driven changes that are transforming our lives.

Haley Britzky 2 hours ago
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Students prep for protests: "We have nothing to lose"

People arrive early for the March For Our Lives rally against gun violence in Washington, DC.
People arrive early for the March For Our Lives rally against gun violence in Washington, DC. Photo: Alex Edelman / AFP / Getty Images

On Saturday, more than 800 March for our Lives protests are expected "in every American state and on every continent except for Antarctica," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The Parkland shooting was the tipping point for many, leading to a surge of the #NeverAgain movement led mostly by young people. Saturday can expect "more than half a million people" in D.C.'s march alone, the NYT reports, along with counter-protests, celebrities, and voting registration.