Hillary Clinton endorsed Joe Biden for president at the former vice president's virtual women’s town hall on Tuesday.

Why it matters: It's another major establishment name endorsing Biden as the Democratic Party coalesces around its presumptive nominee ahead of November's general election.

Between the lines: Clinton is a complicated figure within the Democratic Party, the New York Times notes.

  • Though Clinton maintains a loyal following, she's often criticized for her narrow loss to President Trump in the 2016 election and for alienating progressives — a group that Biden is seeking to court ahead of November.
  • Biden and Clinton ran against each other in the 2008 Democratic primary, though former President Barack Obama eventually chose him as a running mate.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

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