Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Evan Vucci / AP

Sarah Sanders said Wednesday that President Trump supports the Russia sanctions bill, and stated that he did not speak to Vladimir Putin before signing the legislation earlier today. Other highlights from the press briefing:

  • On Trump inaccurately saying he had spoken by phone with the Mexican president and head of Boy Scouts: "I wouldn't say it was a lie. That's a pretty bold accusation. The conversations took place. They just didn't take place over a phone call."
  • On GOP Sen. Flake's jabs at Trump: "I think Sen. Flake would serve his constituents much better if he was less focused on writing a book and attacking the president."

Trump's senior policy advisor, Stephen Miller, on President Trump's latest push to reduce legal immigration:

  • "The most important question when it comes to the U.S. immigration system is who gets a green card... [that's] the golden ticket of U.S. immigration."
  • Basis of Cotton-Perdue immigration bill: "Switching to a skills-based system and ending unfettered chain migration... over time you will cut net migration in half... public support is so immense on this."
  • When NYT reporter Glenn Thrush asked for statistics proving low skilled workers are a detriment to the economy: "Maybe we'll make a carve-out in the bill that says NYT can hire all the low skilled... workers they want... and see how you feel then."
  • When CNN's Jim Acosta asked if the bill would favor people from English-speaking countries: "Your cosmopolitan bias is showing."
  • Will the new immigration bill affect Trump properties? "This legislation deals with green cards with permanent immigration.. those are separate categories from the guest worker visas."
  • On DACA: "Whatever we do is going to prioritize the interests of American citizens and workers."

A veteran WH correspondent's impression of today's briefing:

Go deeper

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.