Photo: Michael Tullberg/Getty Images

Former Republican presidential candidate and ex-CEO of Godfather's Pizza Herman Cain, 74, has died almost a month after being hospitalized for coronavirus.

The big picture: Cain, the co-chair of Black Voices for Trump, was in a high-risk group due to his history with cancer. Cain's positive coronavirus test came less than two weeks after he attended President Trump's controversial June 20 campaign rally in Tulsa, where he tweeted a picture of himself without a mask.

  • Public health officials had warned that the large-scale rally could infect many and put lives at risk.
  • It's unclear whether Cain contracted the virus at the Trump rally.
  • While in the hospital, Cain commented on a July 4 celebration at Mt. Rushmore, tweeting: "Masks will not be mandatory for the event, which will be attended by President Trump. PEOPLE ARE FED UP!"

What they're saying: "Let me deal with some of the particulars of the last few weeks. We knew when he was first hospitalized with COVID-19 that this was going to be a rough fight. He had trouble breathing and was taken to the hospital by ambulance," Dan Calabrese wrote in a statement on Cain's website.

  • "We all prayed that the initial meds they gave him would get his breathing back to normal, but it became clear pretty quickly that he was in for a battle. We didn't release detailed updates on his condition to the public or to the media because neither his family nor we thought there was any reason for that."
  • "There were hopeful indicators, including a mere five days ago when doctors told us they thought he would eventually recover, although it wouldn't be quick. We were relieved to be told that, and passed on the news via Herman's social media. And yet we also felt real concern about the fact that he never quite seemed to get to the point where the doctors could advance him to the recovery phase."

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said in a statement: "Herman Cain embodied the American Dream and represented the very best of the American spirit. Our hearts grieve for his loved ones, and they will remain in our prayers at this time. We will never forget his legacy of grace, patriotism, and faith."

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