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The United States saw a big decline in African-American voter turnout between 2012 and 2016, reaching its lowest point since 2000. Read on to see the change in minority voter turnout, state by state.

Expand chart
Data: Census Bureau; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

Why it matters: There's been so much discussion of the impact of unprecedented factors in the 2016 election — including Russian meddling in social media — that it's easy to forget more basic factors, like the steep drop in the African-American vote since Barack Obama's two elections as president.

Why it happened: A dip in enthusiasm without Obama on the ballot, as well as restrictive voter ID laws. Among the eight states that instituted strict voter ID laws since 2008, five of them saw immediate drops in minority voter turnout, including dramatic dips in Wisconsin, North Dakota and Georgia.

Expand chart
Data: Census Bureau, National Conference of State Legislatures; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

The impact: Between 2012 and 2016, African-Americans shifted from overrepresented to underrepresented among the voters who turned out, according to a Brookings Institution analysis of U.S. census data published in May.

Go deeper

A new Washington

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Image

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Friday that the city should expect a "new normal" for security — even after President-elect Biden's inauguration.

The state of play: Inaugurations are usually a point of celebration in D.C., but over 20,000 troops are now patrolling Washington streets in an unprecedented preparation for Biden's swearing-in on Jan. 20.

Mike Pence calls Kamala Harris to offer congratulations and help

Mike Pence. Photo: Chip Somodevilla via Getty

Vice President Mike Pence called Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on Thursday to congratulate her and offer assistance in the transition, the New York Times first reported.

Why it matters: The belated conversation came six days before the inauguration after a contentious post-election stretch. President Trump has neither spoken with President-elect Joe Biden, nor explicitly conceded the 2020 election.

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

The coronavirus variants: What you need to know

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New variants of the coronavirus circulating globally appear to increase transmission and are being closely monitored by scientists.

Driving the news: The highly contagious variant B.1.1.7 originally detected in the U.K. could become the dominant strain in the U.S. by March if no measures are taken to control the spread of the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.