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President Trump had a busy morning on Twitter, focusing his attention on diverse topics ranging from Charlottesville to this weekend's Fox News' ratings. This week has seen him further diversify his retweet choices, granting a platform to a variety of different voices. A quick roundup of the eight missives he shared with the world:

The context: On its face, this is Trump pitting his working-class base against Jeff Bezos, the billionaire owner of both Amazon and The Washington Post — though, according to the FT, Trump's claim that Amazon is a job destroyer might be wrong.

The context: Moore and Strange — the latter was backed by both Trump and the Republican establishment — advanced to a runoff after last night's Alabama GOP Senate primary.

The context: Hill is a political commentator and cable news mainstay who also sits on the advisory board of Trump's re-election campaign. Consider this the Twitter version of Trump's daily folder.

The context: Trump can often be expected to retweet Fox & Friends, a staple of his morning media diet. Interestingly, Curtis, a former Democrat, was by far the most moderate — he was hammered by outside right-wing PACs for his political stances — of the candidates in the race to replace departed Rep. Jason Chaffetz.

The context: This appears to be Trump's way of congratulating one of his favorite media personalities from Fox News, retweeting The Five co-host's own retweet of a compliment.

The context: Trump's statement yesterday afternoon in the Trump Tower lobby was ostensibly focused on infrastructure. This retweet from Fox News would have you believe that was the case — though things quickly went off the rails.

The context: North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un backed down on a threat to launch missiles toward the U.S. territory of Guam earlier this week.

The context: None needed here. This is a Trump classic.

The context: Though he still came in second to Roy Moore, Strange was recently polling in the mid-to-high 20s, according to 538, and ended up finishing with 32.8% of the vote — but it's unclear if that's due to Trump's support.

The context: Trump faced criticism yesterday for seemingly establishing a moral equivalence between white nationalists and those who protested them, like Heyer, in Charlottesville. That's led to attacks from prominent Republicans like Sens. Mitch McConnell and Lindsey Graham.

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
20 mins ago - Economy & Business

The fragile recovery

Data: Department of Labor; Chart: Axios Visuals

The number of people receiving unemployment benefits is falling but remains remarkably high three weeks before pandemic assistance programs are set to expire. More than 1 million people a week are still filing for initial jobless claims, including nearly 300,000 applying for pandemic assistance.

By the numbers: As of Nov. 14, 20.2 million Americans were receiving unemployment benefits of some kind, including more than 13.4 million on the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) programs that were created as part of the CARES Act and end on Dec. 26.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
40 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The top candidates Biden is considering for key energy and climate roles

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has urged President-elect Joe Biden to nominate Mary Nichols, chair of California's air pollution regulator, to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: The reported push by Schumer could boost Nichol's chances of leading an agency that will play a pivotal role in Biden's vow to enact aggressive new climate policies — especially because the plan is likely to rest heavily on executive actions.

U.S. economy adds 245,000 jobs in November as recovery slows

Data: BLS; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. economy added 245,000 jobs in November, while the unemployment rate fell to 6.7% from 6.9%, the government said on Friday.

Why it matters: The labor market continues to recover even as coronavirus cases surge— though it's still millions of jobs short of the pre-pandemic level. The problem is that the rate of recovery is slowing significantly.

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