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Here's a roadmap for Trump's morning tweets

President Trump had a busy morning on Twitter, focusing his attention on diverse topics ranging from Charlottesville to this weekend's Fox News' ratings. This week has seen him further diversify his retweet choices, granting a platform to a variety of different voices. A quick roundup of the eight missives he shared with the world:

The context: On its face, this is Trump pitting his working-class base against Jeff Bezos, the billionaire owner of both Amazon and The Washington Post — though, according to the FT, Trump's claim that Amazon is a job destroyer might be wrong.

The context: Moore and Strange — the latter was backed by both Trump and the Republican establishment — advanced to a runoff after last night's Alabama GOP Senate primary.

The context: Hill is a political commentator and cable news mainstay who also sits on the advisory board of Trump's re-election campaign. Consider this the Twitter version of Trump's daily folder.

The context: Trump can often be expected to retweet Fox & Friends, a staple of his morning media diet. Interestingly, Curtis, a former Democrat, was by far the most moderate — he was hammered by outside right-wing PACs for his political stances — of the candidates in the race to replace departed Rep. Jason Chaffetz.

The context: This appears to be Trump's way of congratulating one of his favorite media personalities from Fox News, retweeting The Five co-host's own retweet of a compliment.

The context: Trump's statement yesterday afternoon in the Trump Tower lobby was ostensibly focused on infrastructure. This retweet from Fox News would have you believe that was the case — though things quickly went off the rails.

The context: North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un backed down on a threat to launch missiles toward the U.S. territory of Guam earlier this week.

The context: None needed here. This is a Trump classic.

The context: Though he still came in second to Roy Moore, Strange was recently polling in the mid-to-high 20s, according to 538, and ended up finishing with 32.8% of the vote — but it's unclear if that's due to Trump's support.

The context: Trump faced criticism yesterday for seemingly establishing a moral equivalence between white nationalists and those who protested them, like Heyer, in Charlottesville. That's led to attacks from prominent Republicans like Sens. Mitch McConnell and Lindsey Graham.