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Montrealers play in a city water fountain this week. Photo: Eva Hambach/AFP/Getty Images

Across the Northern Hemisphere, several regions saw some of the hottest temperatures on record this week, according to information compiled by the Washington Post. Apart from the U.S. and Canada, these temperatures were not the result of one single heat wave, but rather several different weather systems.

Our thought bubble, from Axios Science Editor Andrew Freedman: "July is typically Earth’s hottest month, so heat records falling now is not unexpected. But so many rare milestones being set or tied worldwide does point to the influence of a warming world, given that the link between heat waves and climate change is robust, according to scientific studies."

By the numbers

Hottest recorded temperatures:

  • Yerevan, Armenia: 107.6°, July 2 (tied its previous record high)
  • Denver, Colorado: 105°, June 28 (tied its previous record high)
  • Montreal, Canada: 97.9° Fahrenheit, July 2. The heat is being blamed for 16 deaths in southern Quebec, the CBC reports.
  • Scotland: 91.7°, June 28 (provisional record)
  • Shannon, Ireland: 89.6°, June 28
  • Castlederg, Northern Ireland: 86.4°, June 29
  • Belfast, Northern Ireland: 85.1°, June 28

Highest recorded low temperature

  • Quriyat, Oman: The temperature never went below 109° on June 28 (the highest low temperature ever recorded on Earth)
  • Burlington, Vermont: 80°, July 2

Heat and humidity

  • Ottawa experienced its "most extreme combination of heat and humidity," on July 1.

Go deeper

4 hours ago - Health

Fauci: COVID vaccine rollout needs to prioritize people of color

Anthony Fauci. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images

Infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci highlighted the need to address racial disparities in the COVID-19 vaccination process, per an interview with The New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday.

What he’s saying: "I think that's the one thing we really got to be careful of. We don't want in the beginning ... most of the people who are getting it are otherwise, well, middle-class white people."

The Mischief Makers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Several Republican and Democratic lawmakers are emerging as troublemakers within their parties and political thorns for their leadership.

Why it matters: We're calling this group "The Mischief Makers" — members who threaten to upend party unity — the theme eclipsing Washington at the moment — and potentially jeopardize the Democrats' or Republicans' position heading into the 2022 midterms.

5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Obama speechwriter fears Biden unity drive is one-sided

Cody Keenan (right) is shown heading to Marine One in December 2009. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Obama's former speechwriter says he's "preemptively frustrated" with President Biden's effort to find unity with Republicans.

What they're saying: Cody Keenan told Axios that Biden's messaging team has "struck all the right chords," but at some point "they're gonna have to answer questions like, 'Why didn't you achieve unity?' when there's an entire political party that's already acting to stop it."

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