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Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Get familiar with the concept of a "record-high nighttime low" temperature.

What's happening: This weekend's heat wave threatens to smash records nationwide, a dangerous situation for humans and animals alike.

  • Humidity "levels will make it feel as hot or hotter than the Southwest in parts of the Central and Eastern states,"according to Accuweather.

Why it matters: It can become very dangerous when temperatures don't cool down at night, meteorologists tell the AP. Parts of the East Coast won’t drop below the mid- to upper-70s or even 80s at night.

The big picture: "Hot weather is nothing new, of course," the New York Times reports, "especially in July. But climate change is making heat waves like this one more common."

Between the lines: This could also take a toll on flood-ravaged farms.

  • The "floods of the spring that delayed U.S. planting have meant plants have shallower roots and this is exacerbating the impact of the heat," per Bloomberg.
  • "Normally, it would take four or five days of temperatures in the 90s to stress crops ... [when] the root systems are as shallow as they are this year it only takes a day or two."

The bottom line: This wouldn't be a bad weekend to check up on your neighbors and family, particularly the elderly.

Go deeper: All the global temperature records broken in 2019, so far

Go deeper

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.