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Photo: Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

Hearst Magazines president Troy Young resigned Thursday following a report from The New York Times that alleged he fostered a toxic workplace environment, according to an internal memo obtained by Axios.

The big picture: Young is the latest high-level media executive to resign after employees complained about inappropriate behavior. From 2017-2019, many executives were ousted due to complaints of sexual harassment. This year, several business leaders have resigned amid allegations of insensitivity around race and diversity.

What they're saying: The memo, written to employees from Hearst President & Chief Executive Officer Steven R. Swartz, said he and Young "have agreed that it is in the best interest of all of us that he resign his position as president of Hearst Magazines, effective immediately."

  • "I recognize that the incidents cited in the NYT article are particularly offensive to women and I want to make clear they do not represent who I am as a person," Young said in response to the Times' reporting.

Catch up quick: A New York Times report published Wednesday found that, in conversations with current and former employees at Hearst, Young repeatedly made lewd remarks to employees.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Sep 30, 2020 - Economy & Business

Executives think they're handling the future of work — but workers disagree

Data: IBM Institute for Business Value; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

A new survey finds employers are embracing a new, more digitized way of working accelerated by the pandemic, while employees fear being left behind.

Why it matters: The realities of COVID-19 compressed years of remote work growth into a matter of months. But the onus is now on executives to support their workforces as the crisis shifts to the new normal.

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.