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Reproduced from Avalere Health; Chart: Axios Visuals

The pandemic has exacerbated a racial disparity in insurance coverage, in addition to its myriad other racial inequities, per a new Avalere analysis.

Why it matters: Before the pandemic, Black and Latino Americans were already much less likely than white Americans to have employer-based coverage. And now they're losing that coverage at a greater rate.

Between the lines: Workers of color have seen higher employment declines than white workers.

  • Many people who lost their employer coverage will be able to turn to Medicaid or subsidized plans through the Affordable Care Act, but those aren't as generous as typical employer plans.
  • "Overall, the shift away from employer-sponsored insurance could be challenging for patients," said Avalere's Tom Kornfield. "Many of these patients could face less generous benefit design, greater cost sharing, and more limited formularies in Medicaid or in the individual market."

And Medicaid may not be an option for people in states that haven't expanded the program — which are heavily concentrated in the South.

  • Even before the pandemic, Black Americans in non-expansion states were more likely to be uninsured than white Americans in those states. Non-expansion states also generally have higher Black populations than expansion states.

Related: As of this month, 26% of Black Americans are uninsured — a sharp increase from 17% in February, according to a new survey by Civis Analytics.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 23, 2020 - World

Oxford University says its coronavirus vaccine is up to 90% effective

A scientist working during at the Oxford Vaccine Group's laboratory facility at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford, England, in June. Photo: Steve Parsons/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The University of Oxford announced Monday that a COVID-19 vaccine it's developed with AstraZeneca is 70.4% effective in preventing people from developing symptoms, per interim data from Phase 3 trials.

Why it matters: The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is shown to work in different age groups and can be stored at fridge temperature. It is much cheaper than other vaccines in development and is part of the global COVAX initiative, designed to ensure doses go where they're most needed.

In photos: Americans wait at food banks before Thanksgiving

Residents line up in their cars at a food distribution site in Clermont, Fla., Nov. 21. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Thousands of Americans waited in long lines at food banks in the week before Thanksgiving to pick up turkeys, canned goods, broccoli and other vegetables.

Why it matters: As the holiday season approaches, families across the U.S. are in need of food assistance due to chronic unemployment and economic hardship caused by COVID-19 — and many food pantries already served an unprecedented number of people this spring.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.