Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

The U.S. is facing a series of potentially devastating health care threats — some within the next decade, and some that have already manifested as a part of everyday life. 

Between the lines: As Washington struggles with staggering hospital bills and prescription drug costs, society also faces even more difficult problems fueled by the aging population, the economics of health care and the rise of drug-resistant infections.

The big picture: The cost issues Washington is debating are important. It's just that those problems pale in comparison to the ones political leaders are not focusing on.

  • But many of these those will soon become impossible to ignore.
Affordability issues

Premiums, deductibles and the underlying cost of care will all only continue to go up.

  • As Baby Boomers age into Medicare, health care providers will likely raise their rates for private insurance to make up for the lost revenue — squeezing employers, employees and taxpayers in the process.
  • Medicare's hospital benefit is expected to be spending more than it has to spend by 2026, threatening benefits.
  • Most middle-income seniors won't be able to afford long-term care, as the NYT recently reported.
  • The drug pricing debate is stuck mostly in the past, as the future of medicine increasingly features multi-million-dollar personalized medications unlikely to ever have competition.
Access issues

A flood of rural hospital closures is leaving many communities with no easy access to emergency care.

  • The Washington Post profiled a hospital on the brink of closure this weekend, and Kaiser Health News yesterday wrote about what life is like post-hospital closure.
  • The U.S. will be short as many as 122,000 doctors by 2032, according to a recent study by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Primary care will be short between 21,100 and 55,200 doctors, while specialty care will face a shortage of between 24,800 and 65,800.
Health threats

The opioid epidemic continues to ravage the country, with no real end in sight.

Drug-resistant infections continue to rise, without any real government incentives for drug companies to develop new antibiotics. The UN warned last month that antimicrobial resistance could kill 10 million people a year globally by 2050.

Climate change will also be a health care crisis; it's expected to make infectious, tropical and respiratory diseases worse. Pharmaceutical companies are already preparing for that business opportunity.

The bottom line: It's hard to see how any of these topics become more prominent than the debate over Medicare for All or how to drive down spending on prescription drugs over the next couple of years. But we avoid dealing with them at our own peril.

Go deeper

5 hours ago - World

Maximum pressure campaign escalates with Fakhrizadeh killing

Photo: Fars News Agency via AP

The assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the architect of Iran’s military nuclear program, is a new height in the maximum pressure campaign led by the Trump administration and the Netanyahu government against Iran.

Why it matters: It exceeds the capture of the Iranian nuclear archives by the Mossad, and the sabotage in the advanced centrifuge facility in Natanz.

Scoop: Biden weighs retired General Lloyd Austin for Pentagon chief

Lloyd Austin testifying before Congress in 2015. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden is considering retired four-star General Lloyd Austin as his nominee for defense secretary, adding him to a shortlist that includes Jeh Johnson, Tammy Duckworth and Michele Flournoy, two sources with direct knowledge of the decision-making tell Axios.

Why it matters: A nominee for Pentagon chief was noticeably absent when the president-elect rolled out his national security team Tuesday. Flournoy had been widely seen as the likely pick, but Axios is told other factors — race, experience, Biden's comfort level — have come into play.

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York COVID restrictions.
  3. World: Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.
  4. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in December Black Friday shopping across the U.S., in photosAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.