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Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Health care hiring has surged over the past few years, but the influx of bodies won't necessarily alleviate an impending wave of coronavirus cases.

The big picture: Most new health care jobs are on the administrative side — not doctors, nurses or other clinical staff who are needed to help triage and care for patients.

Where things stand: The health care industry has added roughly 914,000 jobs over the past three years — more than the population of San Francisco — and a large chunk of those jobs came in outpatient settings like physician offices.

  • However, more granular federal data show a majority of the hires have been for administrative and clerical jobs, like hospital billing, collections, IT, marketing and insurance contracting.
  • Many home health jobs have been created, which could help older adults who have chronic illnesses and need to stay at home during the outbreak, but the biggest need will be in hospital intensive care units.

The bottom line: "We have a lot of fat in our health care system," said Bob Kocher, a doctor and partner at Venrock. "But we don't have any fat on the clinical workforce side."

Go deeper: A longer coronavirus outbreak is the best outcome for the health care system

Go deeper

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.

Senate confirms Antony Blinken as secretary of state

Antony Blinken. Photo: Alex Edelman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate voted 78-22 on Tuesday to confirm Antony Blinken as secretary of state.

Why it matters: Blinken, a longtime adviser to President Biden, will lead the administration's diplomatic efforts to re-engage with the world after four years of former President Trump's "America first" policy.

2 hours ago - World

Former Google CEO and others call for U.S.-China tech "bifurcation"

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A new set of proposals by a group of influential D.C. insiders and tech industry practitioners calling for a degree of "bifurcation" in the U.S. and Chinese tech sectors is circulating in the Biden administration. Axios has obtained a copy.

Why it matters: The idea of "decoupling" certain sectors of the U.S. and Chinese economies felt radical three years ago, when Trump's trade war brought the term into common parlance. But now the strategy has growing bipartisan and even industry support.