Sep 9, 2019

Health care has been adding jobs for over 5 years

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Data: BLS; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The health care industry added almost 24,000 jobs in August, helping to buoy overall employment growth amid economic fears associated with the U.S.-China trade war.

The big picture: Almost 1 out of every 9 Americans works in health care, and the industry has not seen a net loss of new jobs in any month since January 2014. But everyone's insurance premiums and tax dollars are funding this swelling workforce.

Between the lines: More than half of all health care job additions occurred in ambulatory settings, like doctors' offices, outpatient centers and home health agencies.

The bottom line: Health economist Uwe Reinhardt famously said, "Every dollar of health spending = someone else's dollar of health care income." A consistently growing workforce means it'll be that much more difficult to control the country's ballooning health care spending.

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Health care dominates 2019 ad spending

Data: Advertising Analytics; Chart: Axios Visuals

More than half of all issue advertising this year has been on health care, and that spending will only increase as the 2020 campaign gets closer.

Between the lines: Most of the top health care spenders are focused on issues like surprise medical bills and drug prices — many of which would cut into the health care industry's profits.

Go deeperArrowSep 11, 2019

Separating hype from reality in health tech

Data: Kaiser Family Foundation Health Apps and Information Survey; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Tech companies trying to disrupt the health care system still have a long way to go.

Why it matters: Splashy health tech announcements are everywhere, but many are more hype than reality, according to a poll conducted for this column.

Go deeperArrowSep 10, 2019

Medtech's quick-fix addiction

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Some technologists look at the pileup of crises weighing down American health care — overworked doctors, overpriced treatments, wacky health record systems — and see an opportunity to overhaul the industry, which could save lives and make them money.

Yes, but: There's frequently a chasm between can-do engineers itching to rethink health care and the deliberate doctors and nurses leery of tech that can make their lives more complicated, or worse, harm their patients.

Go deeperArrowOct 5, 2019