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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Venture capital is beginning a belated conversation about its dearth of black investors and support of black founders, but hasn't yet turned its attention to the trivial participation of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) as limited partners in funds.

Why it matters: This increases educational and economic inequality, as the vast majority of VC profits go to limited partners.

The big picture: Many college endowments invest some of their funds into alternative assets like venture capital. This is particularly true for some of the country's richest endowments, like Harvard, Yale and Stanford.

  • But HBCUs have relatively small endowments, with none valued at even $1 billion in 2019.
  • Smaller schools often lack robust internal investment teams and lean heavily on outside advisors.
  • They also may be less willing to tie up their limited resources in a long-term, high-risk asset class like venture capital.

"In order to execute an asset allocation program, it just becomes easier when you have more dollars to put into it," says Plexo Capital founder Lo Toney, whose fund is backed by his alma mater, Hampton University.

  • "When it comes to venture ... you have a lot of closed-end vehicles, and you have to invest into multiple of them to remain dedicated to the asset class," he adds.
  • Still, there are exceptions. Spelman College, for example, last year allocated 37.4% of its $390 million endowment to private equity, venture capital and distressed investments.

Established VC firms rarely need new limited partners, which creates an added challenge for interested HBCUs to get their foot in the door.

  • "A lot of the historically successful firms ... their existing LPs would invest as much as they can, so there’s not really room ... unless you just say, 'this is important to us,'" explains Unusual Ventures co-founder John Vrionis, whose funds have multiple HBCUs as investors.
  • Equal Ventures co-founder Richard Kerby argues that it’s also incumbent on fund managers to educate the schools about the value in investing in venture capital.
  • VC firms do often try to get investments from their alma maters, but there were fewer than 60 HBCU alumni working in VC as of a February 2019 analysis — and nearly 40% of those came from a single school (Morehouse University).

The bottom line: Getting more HBCUs into VC funds can be done — it’ll just require the will and the effort from both the endowments and the fund managers if they see a mutual benefit in changing the equation.

Go deeper:

Editor's note: The story has been corrected to show that 40% of HBCU alumni in VC came from Morehouse (not Howard).

Go deeper

Jul 28, 2020 - Economy & Business

Media and telecom deals down due to coronavirus pandemic

Reproduced from PwC; Chart: Axios Visuals

Deal volume for the media and telecom industry has slowed significantly during the coronavirus, according to the latest report from PwC.

Yes, but: Some companies, like Industry Dive, with healthy balance sheets and access to capital are still trying to find opportunistic investments.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Education: Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong puts tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge — Pfizer to supply 40 million vaccine doses to lower-income countries — Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca vaccine.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

DOJ: Capitol rioter threatened to "assassinate" Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Supporters of former President Trump storm the U.S. Captiol on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A Texas man who has been charged with storming the U.S. Capitol in the deadly Jan. 6 siege posted death threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Department of Justice said.

The big picture: Garret Miller faces five charges in connection to the riot by supporters of former President Trump, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and making threats. According to court documents, Miller posted violent threats online the day of the siege, including tweeting “Assassinate AOC.”