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Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told The Daily Beast that Democrats should kill the filibuster to pass climate change legislation if they take control of the Senate in 2020.

"[T]he No. 1 priority is climate change. There’s nothing that affects my children, grandchildren, and their children, right now, more than climate."

The state of play: Multiple 2020 Democrats have already come out in favor of abolishing the filibuster in order to pass legislation. Elizabeth Warren and Jay Inslee have both backed the idea — with Inslee explicitly tying it to climate change.

  • This week, Beto O'Rourke said he would abolish it to pass gun control.

Catch up quick: Reid has previously said that he expects the filibuster to disappear, but has not explicitly called upon Democrats to be the ones to make the change. He told Politico in 2016 that rules are "going to erode, it’s just a question of when."

  • He reiterated that sentiment in his interview with The Daily Beast: "It is a question of when we get rid of the filibuster. It’s gone. It’s gone."

Of note: In 2013, Reid eliminated the use of the filibuster for most federal judicial nominees — except for the Supreme Court.

  • Once President Trump took office, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell nuked the filibuster for Supreme Court and Cabinet appointments in a Republican-controlled chamber.
  • That's allowed Republicans to install two Supreme Court justices, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. In addition, per NPR, Trump has appointed a quarter of federal appeals judges and 1 in 7 federal district court judges — all pushed through the Senate by McConnell without a filibuster.

Go deeper: Where 2020 Democrats stand on ending the Senate filibuster

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In photos: Virginians line up for hours on first day of early voting

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

In some parts of Virginia, people waited in line up to four hours to cast their ballots on the first day of early voting, according to the Washington Post.

The big picture: The COVID-19 pandemic seems to already have an impact on how people cast their votes this election season. As many as 80 million Americans are expected to vote early, by mail or in person, Tom Bonier, CEO of TargetSmart, a Democratic political data firm, told Axios in August.

Updated 56 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 30,306,469 — Total deaths: 948,147— Total recoveries: 20,626,515Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 6,705,114 — Total deaths: 198,197 — Total recoveries: 2,540,334 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.

Court battles shift mail-in voting deadlines in battleground states

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Michigan joins Pennsylvania in extending mail-in ballot deadlines by several days after the election, due to the coronavirus pandemic and expected delays in U.S. Postal Service.

The latest: Michigan Court of Claims Judge Cynthia Stephens ruled that all ballots postmarked before Nov. 2 must be counted, so long as they arrive in the mail before election results are certified. Michigan will certify its general election results on Nov. 23.