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Harry Reid. Photo: David Becker/Getty Images

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) told the Washington Post in an interview on Thursday that he is in "complete remission" after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in May 2018.

Why it matters: Prior to undergoing an experimental treatment, the 80-year-old admitted that his prognosis was bleak and even told the New York Times in an interview published in January 2019, "As soon as you discover you have something on your pancreas, you’re dead."

  • Reid was one of four people who joined UCLA cancer specialist Patrick Soon-Shiong's clinical study for cancer patients who had essentially run out of options, according to the Post.
  • Soon-Shiong credits the treatment regimen Reid underwent with saving his life: “Consider the senator the first astronaut to the new universe."

What they're saying: “I wasn’t willing to acknowledge that I was about to get hit by the Grim Reaper," Reid told the Post about his experience suffering from cancer last summer. "There’s no comparison to how I feel — I feel good. I’m alive. ... The simple fact that you have cancer doesn’t mean you quit.”

Editor’s note: This post has been corrected to show that Reid was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in May 2018 (not November 2018).

Go deeper

Pandemic may drive up cancer cases and exacerbate disparities

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Doctors are concerned the coronavirus pandemic is going to lead to an uptick in cancer incidence and deaths — and exacerbate racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities seen with the disease.

Why it matters: The U.S. has made recent advances in lowering cancer deaths — including narrowing the gap between different race and ethnicities in both incidence and death rates. But the pandemic could render some of these advances moot.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

The winners and losers of the pandemic holiday season

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic has upended Thanksgiving and the shopping season that the holiday kicks off, creating a new crop of economic winners and losers.

The big picture: Just as it has exacerbated inequality in every other facet of American life, the coronavirus pandemic is deepening inequities in the business world, with the biggest and most powerful companies rapidly outpacing the smaller players.

Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

The daily rate of new coronavirus infections rose by about 10 percent in the final week before Thanksgiving, continuing a dismal trend that may get even worse in the weeks to come.

Why it matters: Travel and large holiday celebrations are most dangerous in places where the virus is spreading widely — and right now, that includes the entire U.S.