Sep 1, 2017

Harrowing Harvey stories emerge

Satellite images of Simonton, Texas, 45 miles west of Houston (just past Katy), on Nov. 20 and Aug. 30 (DigitalGlobe via AP)

"Don't touch me: I'm dying": "One man used his last words to save a friend's life, warning him away from a live electrical wire. Another died checking on his uncle. Several others were last seen helping people out of floodwaters. They're among Harvey victims who lost their lives trying to save other people. They range from 6 years old to 89. Their stories are emerging as the death toll from the storm continues to mount." (AP)

More numbers from Harvey:

  • Harvey may have ruined up to 1 million vehicles along the Texas Gulf Coast. In the Houston area, about 1 in 7 cars may have been destroyed. (USA Today)
  • White House Homeland Security Adviser Tom Bossert: "[I]t looks like around about 100,000 affected homes. ... some with flood insurance, some underinsured, some uninsured."
  • Death toll: 39 ... Texas Department of Public Safety said more than 37,000 homes heavily damaged and nearly 7,000 were destroyed, figures that did not include the tens of thousands of homes with minor damage. About 325,000 people have already sought federal emergency aid. (AP)
  • Donald Trump Jr. tweets: "Awesome: Trump Pledging $1 Million in Personal Funds to Harvey Relief."
  • Wall Street Journal lead story: "Pump Prices Surge on Fall In Gas Supply: Gas prices reach two-year high after Harvey forces refinery shutdowns, pipeline slows output ... Retail prices for gasoline [nationally] approached $2.49 a gallon [by last evening] ... up about 14 cents from a week ago."

Go deeper: Houston Chronicle banner, "Crawling from crisis toward painful recovery: Thousands in region begin process that could take years." (Read the digital paper free.)

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Updated 23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

Massive demonstrations put police response to unrest in the spotlight

Washington State Police use tear gas to disperse a crowd in Seattle during a demonstration protesting the death of George Floyd. Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The response of some officers during demonstrations against police brutality in the U.S. has been criticized for being excessive by some officials and Black Lives Matter leaders.

Why it matters: The situation is tense across the U.S., with reports of protesters looting and burning buildings. While some police have responded with restraint and by monitoring the protests, others have used batons, tear gas, rubber bullets and other devices to disperse protesters and, in some cases, journalists.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. cities crack down on protesters

The scene near the 5th police precinct during a demonstration calling for justice for George Floyd in Minneapolis on Saturday. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.