Photo: John Moore / Getty Images

USCIS has reached the 65,000 visa cap for H-1B high skilled work visa applications as well as the 20,000 visa cap for those with U.S. advanced degrees. They started accepting applications on Monday.

Why it matters: This is the sixth consecutive year that the H-1B cap has been reached within five days of USCIS accepting petitions for the next year, which many tech companies and organizations argue highlights the need for raising the cap.

  • The National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM) Vice President for Global Trade Development Shivendra Singh released a statement, saying, "America’s economy is crying out for more skilled talent, especially in the IT sector. The large number of applications and the speed with which the annual cap is reached demonstrate the high demand for these workers."
  • Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) Senior Vice President of Government Affairs Andy Halataei, told Axios in a statement that “today is a perfect reminder of why the United States needs to fix its immigration system." He also called for support for Sen. Orrin Hatch's I-Squared Act, which would raise the cap for H-1B visas.
  • FWD.us president Todd Schulte told Axios in a statement that the cap impacts medical innovation, job creation, and wage growth in the U.S. “We should have a high-skilled immigration that makes it easier for America to remain a magnet for global talent and innovation - and unfortunately as we are reminded today, our immigration system is currently pushing us in the wrong direction.”
  • Go deeper: The cities with the most H-1B workers

Go deeper

Updated 27 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 33,880,896 — Total deaths: 1,012,964 — Total recoveries: 23,551,663Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 7,232,823 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: Moderna says its coronavirus vaccine won't be ready until 2021
  5. Travel: CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S. waters — Airlines begin mass layoffs while clinging to hope for federal aid
  6. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  7. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.

CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S.

Cruise Ships docked in April at the port at Marina Long Beach due to a no-sail order in Long Beach, in California. Photo: Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

There have been at least 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like illness cases on cruise ships in U.S. waters, "in addition to at least 41 reported deaths," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said late Wednesday.

Driving the news: The CDC released the data from the period of March 1 through Sept. 29 in an emailed statement confirming the extension of a No Sail Order for cruise ships through Oct. 31, as first reported by Axios' Jonathan Swan on Tuesday in his article revealing CDC director Robert Redfield was overruled in a push to extend the order into 2021.

Ina Fried, author of Login
4 hours ago - Technology

Facebook removes Trump ads tying refugees to COVID-19

Photo Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook said Wednesday that it was removing a series of ads from President Trump's campaign that linked American acceptance of refugees with increased coronavirus risk, a connection Facebook says is without merit.

Why it matters: The ads were pulled after they received thousands of impressions and are a sign that the Trump campaign continues to test the limits of social media rules on false information.