Dems poll better in swing districts when they discuss gun violence

Scenes from a gun violence rally in Chicago. Photo: Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Democrats' advantage over Republicans in competitive swing House districts increases from a three-point lead to a 10-point lead when they make the race about gun violence prevention, according to a new poll conducted by Global Strategy Group for Giffords PAC, a group that backs stricter gun laws.

Why it matters: Embracing a stricter platform on guns and talking about it on the campaign trail could help Democrats gain ground in dozens of Republican districts — ultimately helping them take back the House.

By the numbers: A full 65% of voters think gun laws should be stricter in the U.S. and 63% are most worried about Congress not doing enough to prevent gun violence.

  • 62% of voters said they've become more likely to consider a candidate's stance on gun laws when heading to the polls.
  • 72% of voters have concerns about a Republican candidate when the messaging is that they are "bought and paid for by the NRA" and that they oppose common sense gun reform.
  • Among independents, Democrats' lead grows by 20 points when the race is between a Democratic candidate who supports stricter gun laws facing a GOP candidate who opposes them.
  • That lead grows by 14 points for Democrats among women  — and by 21 points among college-educated white voters.
  • The NRA is down 19 points in favorability with voters overall with a 56% unfavorable rating.

The bottom line: There has been a significant shift in Americans' likeliness to consider a candidate's stance on gun laws, and these results indicate that many want more action on the issue from those politicians already in office.

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