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Guatemala's government says it will take steps to crack down on the number of migrants traveling to the U.S., including by working with the Department of Homeland Security to re-negotiate an open borders agreement with Nicaragua, El Salvador and Honduras, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: Guatemala's plans are the strongest by any Latin American country to curb migration, according to the Post. The country's interior minister said Guatemala also plans to physically break up migrant caravans and to test families' DNA to ensure people aren't transporting kids that aren't their own.

The big picture: President Trump is pressuring Latin American countries by threatening to stifle their economies or cut aid if they don't work to stop migration that is pouring into the U.S.

  • Trump previously threatened to cut $450 million of aid for Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador if the "failure" continues, per the New York Times.
  • Earlier this month, Trump announced plans to impose a 5% tariff on all products from Mexico, which will gradually increase until they stop migrants from crossing over into the U.S.

Between the lines: Many Central American officials have been cautious about expressing support for Trump's migration policy because their economies also rely greatly on remittances. The largest number of migrants comes from Guatemala, and the country received $9.3 million in remittances in 2018, per the Washington Post.

Go deeper: What we know about Kushner's big immigration plan

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Trump refuses to answer question on whether he supports QAnon conspiracy theory

President Trump on Friday refused to answer a direct question on whether or not he supports the QAnon conspiracy theory during a press briefing.

Why it matters: Trump congratulated Georgia Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene, who vocally supports the conspiracy theory, on her victory in a House primary runoff earlier this week — illustrating how the once-fringe conspiracy theory has gained ground within his party.

Postal workers' union endorses Biden

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The National Association of Letter Carriers, the union representing roughly 300,000 current and former postal workers, on Friday endorsed Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election, calling him "a fierce ally and defender of the U.S. Postal Service," reports NBC News.

Why it matters: The endorsement comes as President Trump has vowed to block additional funding for the USPS in the next coronavirus stimulus package, linking it to his continued baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud.

Lawmakers demand answers from World Bank on Xinjiang loan

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

U.S. lawmakers are demanding answers from the World Bank about its continued operation of a $50 million loan program in Xinjiang, following Axios reporting on the loans.

Why it matters: The Chinese government is currently waging a campaign of cultural and demographic genocide against ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, in northwest China. The lawmakers contend that the recipients of the loans may be complicit in that repression.