Jun 5, 2019

Guatemala unveils measures to crack down on migrants traveling to U.S.

Photo: Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Guatemala's government says it will take steps to crack down on the number of migrants traveling to the U.S., including by working with the Department of Homeland Security to re-negotiate an open borders agreement with Nicaragua, El Salvador and Honduras, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: Guatemala's plans are the strongest by any Latin American country to curb migration, according to the Post. The country's interior minister said Guatemala also plans to physically break up migrant caravans and to test families' DNA to ensure people aren't transporting kids that aren't their own.

The big picture: President Trump is pressuring Latin American countries by threatening to stifle their economies or cut aid if they don't work to stop migration that is pouring into the U.S.

  • Trump previously threatened to cut $450 million of aid for Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador if the "failure" continues, per the New York Times.
  • Earlier this month, Trump announced plans to impose a 5% tariff on all products from Mexico, which will gradually increase until they stop migrants from crossing over into the U.S.

Between the lines: Many Central American officials have been cautious about expressing support for Trump's migration policy because their economies also rely greatly on remittances. The largest number of migrants comes from Guatemala, and the country received $9.3 million in remittances in 2018, per the Washington Post.

Go deeper: What we know about Kushner's big immigration plan

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Trump administration asks Congress for $2.5 billion to fight coronavirus

President Trump with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar at the White House in September. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Trump administration sent a letter to Congress Monday requesting a funding commitment of at least $2.5 billion to help combat the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Details: The request for a lump sum account for the Department of Health and Human Services includes $1.25 billion in new funds to fight COVID-19 and $535 would come from untouched funds for the Ebola virus.

Go deeperArrow2 hours ago - Health

WHO won't call coronavirus a pandemic as cases spread

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The World Health Organization will not yet call the coronavirus a pandemic, claiming that needs across affected countries are too varied and the classification would increase fear, per a briefing Monday.

The big picture: As South Korea and Italy stepped up emergency measures in efforts to thwart the spread of the virus, WHO expressed concern about infections with no clear link to China. COVID-19 has killed at least 2,620 people and infected almost 80,000 others, with all but 27 deaths occurring in mainland China.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 4 hours ago - Health

The global scramble to contain the coronavirus

Taking precaution, in the Philippines. Photo: Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

The coronavirus is spreading quickly in cities nowhere near Wuhan, China, and the window to prevent a global pandemic is narrowing.

Zoom in: Here's a look at what comes with a coronavirus outbreak in communities outside China that have been hardest hit so far.

Go deeperArrow4 hours ago - World