Feb 22, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Greyhound bars immigration sweeps

Customs and Border Protection agents board a Greyhound bus in Spokane, Wash., on Feb. 13. Photo: Nicholas K. Geranios/AP

Greyhound said it will stop allowing Border Patrol agents without a warrant to board its buses to conduct routine immigration checks, AP reports.

What they're saying: The company said it'll notify the Department of Homeland Security that it does not consent to unwarranted searches on its buses or in areas of terminals that are not open to the public.

The context: Greyhound has faced pressure from the ACLU, immigrant rights activists and Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson.

  • In many cases, the buses being checked were not crossing or even approaching an international boundary.

Go deeper: Trump has declared war on sanctuary cities

Go deeper

Court rules Trump administration can withhold funds from sanctuary cities

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that the Trump administration can withhold millions of dollars in federal law enforcement grants from sanctuary cities and states that don't cooperate with immigration enforcement, AP reports.

The state of play: Seven states and New York City sued the U.S. government after the Justice Department said in 2017 it would withhold funds from cities and states that don't give immigration enforcement officials access to jails or notice when an undocumented migrant is scheduled to be released from jail, per AP.

Family of Mexican teen killed by border agent cannot sue, SCOTUS rules

Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4, along ideological lines, that the family of a Mexican teenager who was killed across the southern border by a U.S. border agent cannot sue for damages.

Why it matters: The court’s decision avoids inviting more lawsuits from foreign nationals against U.S. law enforcement. The court noted in its opinion that “a cross-border shooting claim has foreign relations and national security implications.”

Schools turn to ride-hailing services to transport students

Jalen Walker heads to football practice using service HopSkipDrive with driver Jacqueline Bouknight in Springfield, Virginia last April. Photo: Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images.

When startups set out to become the “Uber for kids” several years ago, they predicted parents would use them to ferry children to and from school and activities — but they’ve since found a much bigger customer: schools.

The big picture: Companies like HopSkipDrive and Zum are getting much of their business from schools using their services to replace or supplement the traditional school buses, especially for students with special needs or for trips outside of existing routes.