Sep 21, 2019

Photo from Greta Thunberg's 2018 climate strike shows massive growth over a year

Greta Thunberg. Left: Michael Campanella/Getty Images. Right: Reuters

On the left, on Aug. 2018, 15-year-old Greta Thunberg holds a climate strike with a sign reading "School strike for the climate" outside the Swedish parliament. Only a few other students joined her.

Driving the news: At right, Greta Thunberg, now 16, speaks to a huge crowd in Manhattan on Friday as millions of young people flooded streets around the world to demand political leaders take urgent steps to stop climate change. New York City announced its 1.1 million students were allowed to skip school to participate.

The impact: New York City officials said an estimated 60,000 people marched through the city on Friday, as adults swelled the ranks of students.

  • In Melbourne, Australia, organizers said around 300,000 Australians joined rallies across the nation.
  • In the United Kingdom, around 100,000 people attended a rally in central London, while more than 20,000 marched in Edinburgh and approximately 10,000 met in Brighton, organizers estimated.

Flashback: In March, Thunberg led the largest and most widespread demonstration on climate change since the run-up to the Paris climate summit in 2014 and 2015. Students in at least 112 countries participated.

“I believe that once we start behaving as if we were in an existential crisis, then we can avoid a climate and ecological breakdown. But the opportunity to do so will not last for long. We have to start today.”
— Greta Thunberg in her TIME "Next Generation Leaders" interview

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Axios-NewsWhip 2020 attention tracker: Greta's climate moment

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios - Note: Hover over the weekly rank on desktop to see articles and interactions for each candidate and issue.

Thanks to Greta Thunberg, climate change stories generated 18 million interactions on social media over the last two weeks, the most for the issue this year by far, according to data from NewsWhip provided exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: Climate change has lagged in generating significant online interest, even as it's taken on a great urgency among Democrats and young voters. The latest findings suggest the messenger matters.

Go deeperArrowOct 2, 2019

Greta Thunberg addresses climate deniers' attacks and Trump's tweet

Climate activist Greta Thunberg poses on board the Malizia II sailing yacht at the Mayflower Marina. Photo: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist who inspired a global protest movement, responded Wednesday after a wave of climate science deniers targeted her following her UN speech this week — including President Trump.

Driving the news: Trump was the most prominent person to dismiss Thunberg, mocking her in a late-night tweet Monday after she urged leaders in New York to act because people are already dying from climate change. But many others have weighed in to attack her, from a TV pundit to a state governor, and some of the commentary got personal.

Go deeperArrowSep 26, 2019

Kim Kardashian wants to help Greta Thunberg's social media presence

Greta Thunberg and Kim Kardashian. Photos: Getty Images

Kim Kardashian told Reuters Tuesday that she'd like to help teen climate activist Greta Thunberg's parents manage the 16-year-old's social media presence because "speaking on a big platform invites a lot of different opinions and personalities."

Why it matters: The reality TV star has proven herself to be an effective political navigator in the Trump administration, helping to free over a dozen inmates in 2019 and bringing rapper A$AP Rocky's detention in Sweden to President Trump's attention. Thunberg has more than 10 million followers between her Instagram and Twitter accounts while Kardashian has nearly 150 million on Instagram alone.

Go deeperArrowOct 8, 2019